If you would like to ask a CRA member scientist a question, enter your key word in the "Keyword Search" facility. Then click "Profile" and "Ask a question". An addressed email will appear for you to fill in and send. If you have difficulties in finding your key word match, click on the link to our index below, select a word associated with your question, copy and paste into the Keyword Search box.

Become a member

View Become a member's Profile

Become a member

Click here for application forms

Become a Member of CRA

Please complete and email the appropriate application form to Diana Wilkinson (email addresses below):

ACADEMIC: Application form Academic Membership

ORDINARY: Application form

STUDENT (NON-VOTING): Application form

For further information, please contact:

Dr Nilay Thakar
c/- Level 4, AIBN
University of Queensland
St Lucia QLD 4072 Australia
Email: n.thakar@uq.edu.au

Key word index

View Key word index's Profile

Key word index

Index of key words for the search function

adult stem cells
bioinformatic
biomaterials
Bioreactors
bone
cardiomyocyte differentiation
cell fusion
cellular neuroscience
cementum
central nervous system
chronic inflammation
clinical drug screening
Congenital heart disease
Delivery
demyelination
dental pulp
direct reprogramming
Disease models
Drug discovery
embryo
endocultivation
Endoderm differentiation
Epiblast Stem cells 
Epithelial mesenchymal transition
ES
experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
extracellular matrix
genome editing
gingival fibroblasts
human embryonic stem cells
Human embryonic stem cells
human induced pluripotent stem cells
hypoplastic left heart
in vivo tissue engineering
induced
Induced pluripotent stem cells
iPS
iPS cell generation
iPS cells
iPS-derived MSC
kidney disease
kidney repair
Lineage specification
livestock iPSCs
Maxillofacial surgery
mesenchymal induction
mesengenesis
mesenchymal stem cells
Microenvironment
Multiple sclerosis
neural differentiation
neural stem cells
Neural stem cells
neurodegenerative disorders
neuroimmunology
Neurological disorders
osteogenesis
partial
periodontal disease
periodontal ligament
periodontal regeneration
pluripotency, characterisation
pluripotent
profiling
Regenerative medicine
Regulation of pluripotency
reprogramming
Single cell analysis
SMAD signalling
Smart surfaces
somatic
somatic cell nuclear transfer
Stroke
TGFbeta superfamily signalling
Tissue engineering
Translational surgery

Assoc. Professor Ernst Wolvetang

View Assoc. Professor Ernst Wolvetang's Profile

Assoc. Professor Ernst Wolvetang

AIBN Group Leader Stem Cell Engineering Director, Cell Reprogramming Australia

Ask a Question View Website
  • AIBN Group Leader Stem Cell Engineering
  • Director, Cell Reprogramming Australia

Research interests

Associate Professor Wolvetang investigates the properties of the most primitive cells in the human body. These cells have the ability to grow indefinitely and turn into every cell type of the human body. Because of these remarakable properties human embryonic stem cells have attracted great interest as a tool for regenerative medicine.

A/Prof Wolvetang's research is focused on developing human pluripotent stem cell-based therapies and disease models. Because human pluripotent stem cells can be cultured indefinitely and can generate every cell type of the human body, they are the cell type of choice for stem cell based regenerative medicine, and discovery platform for understanding the molecular basis of human disease and development.

The ability to reprogram adult cells into pluripotent cells (called induced pluripotent stem cells) that are essentially equivalent to empryonic stem cells has removed the ethical concerns attached to this brand of stem cell research. It also allows the regeneration of patient specific stem cells that will not suffer from rejection. Generating iPS cells allows the creation of unique disease models previously not available to researchers.

Publications

  1. Wolvetang EJ ,Herszfeld D, Langton-Bunker E, Chung T, Filipczyk A, Houssami S, Koh K, Laslett AL, Michalska A, Nguyen L, Reubinoff BE, Tellis I, Auerbach JM, Ording CJ, Looijenga LHJ, Pera MF. (2006) CD30 is a survival factor and a biomarker for transformed human pluripotent stem cells. Nature Biotech 24(3), 351-357.
  2. Chung TL, Brena RM, Kolle G, Grimmond SM, Berman BP, Laird PW, Pera MF, Wolvetang EJ. (2010) Vitamin C promotes widespread yet specific demethylation of the hESC epigenome. Stem Cells 28(10), 1848-1855.
  3. Chung TL, Turner J, Thakar N, Kolle G, Cooper-White JJ, Grimmond SM, Pera MF, Wolvetang EJ. (2010) Ascorbate Promotes Epigenetic activation of CD30 in Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Stem Cells 28(10), 1782-1793.
  4. Prowse A, Doran M, Cooper-White JJ, Chong F, Munro T, Fitzpatrick J, Chung TL, Haylock DN, Gray PP, Wolvetang EJ. (2010) Long term culture of human embryonic stem cells on recombinant vitronectin in ascorbate free media. Biomaterials 31(32), 8281-8288.
  5. Grandela C, Pera MF, Wolvetang EJ. (2007) p53 is required for etoposide-induced apoptosis of human embryonic stem cells. Stem Cell Research 1(2), 116-128.
  6. Hannan NRF, Wolvetang EJ. (2008) Adipocyte differentiation in human embryonic stem cells transduced with Oct4 shRNA lentivirus. Stem Cells and Development 18(4), 653-660.
  7. Hannan N, Jamshidi P, Pera MF, Wolvetang EJ. (2009) BMP -11 and Myostatin Maintain Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Feeder Free Cultures. Cloning and Stem Cells 11(3), 427-435.
  8. Hudson JE, Frith JE, Donose BC, Rondeau E, Mills RJ, Wolvetang EJ, Brooke GP, Cooper-White JJ. (2010) A synthetic elastomer based on acrylated polypropylene glycol triol with tunable modulus for tissue engineering applications. Biomaterials 31(31), 7937-7947.
  9. Doran MR, Frith JE, Prowse ABJ, Fitzpatrick J, Wolvetang EJ, Munro T, Gray PP, Cooper-White JJ. (2010) Defined high protein content surfaces for stem cell culture. Biomaterials 31(19), 5137-5142.
  10. Hudson JE, Mills RJ, Frith JE, Brooke G, Jaramillo-Ferrada P, Wolvetang EJ, Cooper-White JJ. (2010) A Defined Media and Substrate for Expansion of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Progenitors that Enriches for Osteo- and Chondro-genic Precursors. Stem Cells Dev 20(1), 77-87.
  11. Prowse ABJ, Wolvetang EJ, Gray PP. (2009) A rapid, cost effective method for counting human embryonic stem cell numbers as clumps. Biotechniques 47(1), 599-606.
  12. Prowse ABJ, Wilson J, Osborne GW, Gray PP, Wolvetang EJ. (2009) Multiplexed staining of live human embryonic stem cells for flow cytometric analysis of pluripotency markers. Stem Cells and Development 18(8), 1135-1140.
  13. Wolvetang EJ, Pera MF, Zuckerman KS. (2007) Gap-junction mediated transport of shRNA between human embryonic stem cells. BiochemBiophys ResComm 363(3), 610-615.
  14. Davidson KC, Daly R, Wolvetang EJ, et al. (2007) Wnt signaling in human embryonic stem cells, in Cytometry part A 69A(5) Pp: 412-412.
  15. Cullinane M, Gong L, Lazar-Adler N, Tra T, Wolvetang EJ, Prescott M, Boyce JD, Devenish RJ, Adler B. (2008) Stimulation of autophagy suppresses the intracellular survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei in mammalian cell lines. Autophagy 4(6), 744-753.
  16. Chung TL, Thaker N, Wolvetang EJ. (2010) Genetic and epigenetic instability of human pluripotent stem cells. The Open Stem Cell Journal (In press).
  17. Ovchinnikov DA, Wolvetang EJ. (2010) Smads – the intracellular hubs of signalling in regulation of pluripotency and differentiation of stem cells in Embryonic Stem Cells. Intech.
  18. Vitale AM, Wolvetang EJ, Mackay-Sim A. (2011) Induced pluripotent cells: a new technology to study human diseases. The International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology (accepted for publication).

Assoc. Professor Alan Davidson

View Assoc. Professor Alan Davidson's Profile

Assoc. Professor Alan Davidson

Principal Investigator, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, University of Auckland

Ask a Question View Website
  • Principal Investigator, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, University of Auckland

Research interests

Generation of human iPS cells from patients with kidney disease.

Publications

  1. O'Brien LL, Grimaldi M, Kostun Z, Wingert RA, Selleck R, Davidson AJ. Wt1a, Foxc1a, and the Notch mediator Rbpj physically interact and regulate the formation of podocytes in zebrafish. Dev Biol. 2011 Oct 15;358(2):318-30.
  2. Wingert RA, Davidson AJ. Zebrafish nephrogenesis involves dynamic spatiotemporal expression changes in renal progenitors and essential signals from retinoic acid and irx3b.  Dev Dyn. 2011 Aug;240(8):2011-27.
  3. Cuong Q. Diep, Dongdong Ma, Rahul C. Deo, Teresa M. Holm, Richard W. Naylor, Natasha Arora, Rebecca A. Wingert, Frank Bollig, Gordana Djordjevic, Benjamin Lichman, Hao Zhu, Takanori Ikenaga, Fumihito Ono, Christoph Englert, Chad A. Cowan, Neil A. Hukriede, Robert I. Handin, Alan J. Davidson. Identification of adult nephron progenitors capable of kidney regeneration in zebrafish. Nature. 2011 Feb 3;470(7332):95-100.
  4. de Jong JLO*, Davidson AJ*, Wang Y, Palis J, Opara P, Pugach E, Daley GQ, and Zon LI.  Retinoic acid signaling suppresses primitive erythroid development. Blood. 2010 Jul 15;116(2):201-9.* equal contribution.
  5. Amigo JD, Ackermann GE, Cope JJ, Langer NB, Shafizadeh E, Shaw GC, Trede NS, Davidson AJ, Kourkoulis G, Hsu K, Kanki J, Shah DI, Lin HF, Handin RI, Zon LI, Cantor AB, and Barry H. Paw.  The Role and Regulation of Friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1) During Blood Development in the Zebrafish. Blood 2009; 114:4654-4663.
  6. Hall C, Flores MV, Chien A, Davidson AJ, Crosier K, and Crosier PJ. Transgenic zebrafish reporter lines reveal conserved Toll-like receptor signaling potential in embryonic myeloid leukocytes and adult immune cell lineages. Leuk Biol 2009; 85:751-765.
  7. Clatworthy AE, Lee JS, Leibman M, Kostun Z, Davidson AJ, and Hung DT. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of zebrafish involves both host and pathogen determinants.  Infect. Immun. 2009; 77:1293-1303.

Assoc. Professor Jeremy M Crook

View Assoc. Professor Jeremy M Crook's Profile

Assoc. Professor Jeremy M Crook

Head, Stem Cells & Disease Models Laboratory Centre for Neural Engineering; and Associate Professor & Principal Fellow Department of Surgery – St Vincent’s Hospital The University of Melbourne Principal Researcher Optics & Nanoelectronics Research Group NICTA Victorian Research Laboratory

Human embryonic stem cells; Induced pluripotent stem cells; Neural stem cells; Disease models; Drug discovery; Stroke; Neurological disorders; Regenerative medicine
Ask a Question View Website
  • Chief Investigator & Principal Fellow, Synthetic Biosystems Laboratory, ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Intelligent Polymer Research Institute/AIIM Facility, Innovation Campus, University of Wollongong
  • Associate Professor & Principal Fellow, Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong
  • Associate Professor & Principal Fellow (Honorary), Department of Surgery – St Vincent’s Hospital, The University of Melbourne

Websites: http://ipri.uow.edu.au/people/UOW158774.html; electromaterials.edu.au

Research interests

Jeremy’s research involves human pluripotent and neural stem cells for disease modelling and ex vivo tissue engineering, and incorporates novel biomaterials for improved cell culture and differentiation, early phase drug discovery, and regenerative medicine. Jeremy has a special interest in modelling disorders of the human central nervous system (eg. major mental disorders [MMDs] such as schizophrenia) to study disease susceptibility gene dysfunction and environmental risk factors.  By investigating gene-environment interaction Jeremy’s laboratory aims to identify novel biomarkers for improved diagnostics and therapeutics, and provide a new framework for understanding the etiopathology of MMDs. Jeremy’s approach is complimentary to in vivo experimentation and other conventional research methods, and fits well with the broadly accepted notion that a better understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying MMDs must be forthcoming before new diagnostic tools and better treatments can be developed.

Publications

1. Stewart E, Kobayashi NR, Higgins M, Quigley A, Moulton S, Kapsa R, Wallace G, Crook JM (2014) Electrical Stimulation Using Conductive Polymer Polypyrrol Promotes Neuronal Differentiation of Human Neural Stem Cells: A Biocompatible Platform for Translational Neural Tissue Engineering. Tissue Engineering Part C - Methods. In Press.

2. Felimban R, Ye K, Di Bella C, Crook JM, Traianedes K, Moulton S, Wallace G, Kapsa R, Quigley A, Choong PFM, Myers D (2014) Differentiation of stem cells derived from human infrapatellar fat pad for cartilage engineering: Characterisation of cells undergoing chondrogenesis. Tissue Engineering: Part A. Epub ahead of print. DOI: 10.1089/ten.2013.0657.

3. Crook JM and Stacey G (2014) Setting Quality Standards for Stem Cell Banking, Research and Translation: The International Stem Cell Banking Initiative. In Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine: Stem Cell Banking; ed Turksen K. Springer. pp3-10.

4. Stacey G, Crook JM, Hei D, Ludwig T (2013) Banking human induced pluripotent stem cells: lessons learned from embryonic stem cells? Cell Stem Cell. 13(4):385-388.

5. Amps et al. (2011) Screening ethnically diverse human embryonic stem cells identifies a chromosome 20 minimal amplicon conferring growth advantage. Nature Biotech. 29(12):1132-1144.

6. Luong MX, Auerbach J, Crook JM, Daheron L, Hei D, Lomax G, Loring JF, Ludwig T, Schlaeger TM, Smith KP, Stacey G, Xu RH, Zeng F (2011) A call for standardized naming and reporting of human ES and iPS cell lines. Cell Stem Cell. 8(4):357-359.

7. Tomaskovic-Crook E & Crook JM (2011) Human Embryonic Stem Cell Therapies for Neurodegenerative Diseases. CNS Neurol Disord Drug Targets. 10(4):440-448.

8. Crook JM (2011) Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells: an overview. In: Human Stem Cell Technology and Biology: A Research Guide and Laboratory Manual. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. pp289-296.

9. Kobayashi NR, Sui L, Tan PS, Lim EK, Chan J, Choolani M & Crook JM (2010) Modelling disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 loss of function in human neural progenitor cells: tools for molecular studies of human neurodevelopment and neuropsychiatric disorders. Nature Molec Psychiatry. 15:672–675.

10. Crook JM (2010) Human iPS Cells: Science and Ethics. The Open Stem Cell Journal. 2:1. Editorial. Hot Topic / Special Issue.

11. Phillips BW, Horn R, Tan SL, Rust WL, Tan TT & Crook JM (2008) Attachment and growth of human embryonic stem cells on microcarriers. J of Biotechnol, 138(1-2):24-32.

12. Crook JM, Peura T, Kravets L, Bosman A, Buzzard JJ, Horne R, Hentze H, Dunn NR, Zweigerdt R, Chua F, Upshall A, Colman A (2007) The generation of six clinical-grade human embryonic stem cell lines. Cell Stem Cell, 1:490-494.

13. Crook JM, Horne R & Colman A (2006) Standard Culture of Human Embryonic Stem Cells, In Human Embryonic Stem Cells: The Practical Handbook; ed. Sullivan S, Cowan C & Eggan K, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. pp53-79.


14. Bibikova M, Chudin E, Wu B, Zhou L, Garcia EW, Liu Y, Shin S, Plaia TW, Auerbach JM, Arking DE, Gonzalez R, Crook J, Davidson B, Schulz TC, Robins A, Khanna A, Sartipy P, Hyllner J, Vanguri P, Savant-Bhonsale S, Smith AK, Chakravarti A, Maitra A, Rao M, Barker DL, Loring JF & Fan JB (2006) Human Embryonic Stem Cells Have a Unique Epigenetic Signature. Genome Research. 16(9):1075-1083.

15. Crook JM, Dunn NR & Colman A (2006) Repressed by a NuRD. Nature Cell Biol. 8(3):212-214.

16. Maitra A, Arking DE, Shivapurkar N, Ikeda M, Stastny V, Kassauei K, Sui G, Cutler DJ, Liu Y, Brimble SN, Noaksson K, Hyllner J, Schulz TC, Zeng X, Freed WJ, Crook J, Abraham S, Colman A, Sartipy P, Matsui S, Carpenter M, Gazdar AF, Rao M, & Chakravarti A (2005) Genomic alterations in cultured human embryonic stem cells. Nature Genetics. 37(10):1099-103.

17. Buzzard JJ, Gough NM, Crook JM, & Colman A (2004) Karyotype of human ES cells during extended culture. Nature Biotech. 22(4):381-382.
 

Assoc. Professor Sharon Ricardo

View Assoc. Professor Sharon Ricardo's Profile

Assoc. Professor Sharon Ricardo

Associate Professor Renal Regeneration Group Leader Director, MBio Graduate School, Monash University

iPS cells, adult stem cells, kidney repair, kidney disease, chronic inflammation, clinical drug screening
Ask a Question View Website
  • Group Leader, Kidney Stem Cell and Regeneration Laboratory
  • Director, MBio Graduate School, Monash University

Research interests

The Kidney Regeneration and Stem Cell Laboratory at MISCL, Monash University focuses on the development of stem cell-based therapies and/or growth factors that may repair damaged kidney tissues and reverse the development of scarring, thereby reducing the need for kidney dialysis or organ transplantation.

Ongoing projects include:

  1. Pluripotent stem cells from patients with kidney disease
    We have recently derived iPS cells from human kidneys (Song et al, JASN 2011) and are currently generating iPS cells from patients with genetic kidney disease including polycystic kidney disease and Alports Syndrome. These iPS lines that maintain the disease genotype and phenotype, will be used for disease modeling and screening new and existing drug compounds that will offer alternatives to the limited framework of prevailing clinical options. The long-term objective is to developiPS cells as a method to produce differentiated human kidney cell types in sufficient quantities that can be used in high-throughput in vitro toxicity screens and ultimately cell therapies for patients with chronic kidney disease.
  2. Immune modulation and bone marrow-derived cells in kidney repair
    This research is focused on the development of strategies to promote kidney ‘self-repair’ and the monocyte/macrophage phenotypesthat are important in this process. As we have recently reported (Alikhan et al. Am J Pathol 2011)macrophages are critical regulators of tissue homeostasis, providing an essential role during organogenesis and adult tissue repair. We are interested in the processes underlying inflammation and repair that are driven by macrophages/monocytes. Understanding the heterogeneous nature of myeloid cells and the supporting stromal cells during inflammation and tissue repair provides the means to identify, recruit and polarise desirable populations, and raises new and exciting therapeutic possibilities to attenuate or conceivably reverse progressive renal disease.

Publications

  1. Li J, Deane JA, Campanale NV, Bertram JF, and Ricardo S.D. Modulation of the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to renal repair and the development of interstitial fibrosis. Stem Cells 2007:25(3):697-706.
  2. Ricardo S.D., H van Goor. Eddy A.A. Macrophage diversity in renal injury and repair. Journal of Clinical Investigation 2008:118(11); 3522-3530.
  3. Verghese E, Ricardo SD, Weindenfeld R, Liang R, Hill P, Langham R, Deane JA. Renal Primary Cilia Lengthen after Acute Tubular Necrosis. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 2009; 20(10): 2147-2153. Featured on cover.
  4. Zhuang J, Deane JA, Yang RB, Li J, Ricardo S.D. Scube-1, a novel developmental gene involved in renal regeneration and repair. Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation 2010; 25: 1421 – 1428.
  5. Williams TM, Little MH, Ricardo SD. Invited review: Macrophages in Renal Development, Injury and Repair. Seminars in Nephrology 2010; 30:255-267.
  6. Lin A, Kolle G, Grimmond S, Zhou G, Doust E, Little MH, Aronow B, Ricardo S, Pera MF, Bertram JF, Laslett A. Subfractionation of differentiating hES cell populations allows the isolation of a mesodermal population enriched for intermediate mesoderm and putative renal progenitors. Stem Cells and Development, 2010 19(10): 1637-1648.
  7. Alikhan M, Jones CV, Williams TM, Beckhouse AG, Fletcher AL. Kett MM, Sakkal S, Samuel CS, Ramsay RG, Deane JA, Wells CA, Little MH, Hume DA, Ricardo SD. CSF-1 promotes kidney development and postnatal repair via alteration of a macrophage response. American Journal Pathology, 179 (3): 1243-1256, 2011.
  8. Song B, Niclis J, Alikhan M, Sakkal S, Sylvain A, Kerr PG, Laslett AL, Bernard CA and Ricardo SD. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human mesangial cells. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 22(7):1213-1220, 2011. Featured in editorial highlight; cover image.
  9. Wise AF and Ricardo SD. Invited Review: Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Kidney Inflammation and Repair. (In Press) Nephrology, 2011.
  10. Song B, Sun G, Herszfeld D, Sylvain S, Campanale N, Hirst CE, Caine S, Parkington H, Tonta MA, Coleman HA, Short M, Ricardo SD, Reubinoff B, and Bernard CCA. Neural differentiation of patient specific iPS cells as a novel approach to study the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis. Stem Cell Research (In Press) 2011.

Dr Alexis Bosman

View Dr Alexis Bosman's Profile

Dr Alexis Bosman

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute

Ask a Question  
  • Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute

Research interests

Dr Alexis Bosman’s research interests include the creation of pluripotent stem cells for modelling cardiac disease and the investigation of these cells upon differentiation into cardiac lineages.

Publications

TBA.

Dr Andrew Laslett

View Dr Andrew Laslett's Profile

Dr Andrew Laslett

Research Group Leader | Stem Cells, CSIRO Materials Science & Engineering

human embryonic stem cells, human induced pluripotent stem cells, pluripotency, characterization
Ask a Question View Website
  • Research Group Leader
  • Stem Cells CSIRO Materials Science & Engineering

Research interests

Andrew and his team joined CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering in August 2009. Prior to this he was a Senior Scientist and Group Leader of the Human Embryonic Stem Cell Technology Laboratory at the Australian Stem Cell Centre. Dr Laslett’s research compares human embryonic stem cells to human induced pluripotent stem cells and is focused on exploiting the basic biology of these cell types to create novel tools that enhance pluripotent cell research translation. He leads an independent program as well as having significant national and international collaborations

Publications

  1. Laslett AL, Filipczyk A & Pera MF (2003). Characterization and Culture of Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Trends In Cardiovascular Medicine 13(7):295-301. Impact factor 4.367
  2. Martin F. Pera, Adam Filipczyk, Susan M. Hawes, and Andrew L. Laslett (2003) Isolation, characterization, and differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. Methods in Enzymology 365: 429-46. Impact factor 1.904
  3. Herszfeld D, Wolvetang E, Filipczyk A, Langton –Bunker E, Koh K, Nguyen L, Tellis I, Michalska A, Laslett AL, Reubinoff BE, Houssami S, Looijenga LH and Pera MF (2006) CD30 is a survival factor and a biomarker for transformed human pluripotent stem cells. Nature Biotechnology 24(3):351-7.  Impact factor 29.495 
  4. Laslett AL, Grimmond S, Gardiner B, Stamp L, Lin A, Hawes S, Wormald S, Nikolic-Paterson D, Haylock D and Pera MF (2007)  Transcriptional Analysis of Early Lineage Commitment In Human Embryonic Stem Cells.  BMC Developmental Biology Mar 2;7:12. Impact factor 3.290
  5. Filipczyk AA, Laslett AL, Mummery C & Pera MF (2007) Differentiation is Coupled to Changes in the Cell Cycle Regulatory Apparatus of Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Stem Cell Research 1:1; 45-60. Impact factor 3.368
  6. Gubhaju L, Laslett A, Bertram JF, Zulli A, Black JM (2008) Immunohistochemical localisation of TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, GCTM-2 and podocalyxin in the developing baboon kidney. Histochemistry and Cell Biology 129(5):651-7. Impact factor 3.021 
  7. Kolle G, Ho SHM, Zhou Q, Chy HS, Krishnan K, Cloonan N, Bertoncello I, Laslett AL and Grimmond SM (2009) Identification of human embryonic stem cell surface markers by combined membrane-polysome translation state array analysis and immunotranscriptional profiling. Stem Cells 27:2446–2456. Impact factor 7.871
  8. Shelley R. Hough, Andrew L. Laslett, Sean Grimmond, Gabriel Kolle, and Martin F. Pera. (2009) A continuum of cell states spans pluripotency and lineage commitment in human embryonic stem cells.  PLoS One.  2009 Nov 5;4(11):e7708. Impact factor 4.351
  9. Louise C Laurent, Caroline M Nievergelt, Candace Lynch, Eyitayo Fakunle, Julie Harness, Uli Schmidt, Vasiliy Galat, Andrew L Laslett, Timo Otonkoski, Hans Keirstead, Andrew Schork, Hyun-Sook Park & Jeanne F Loring (2010) Restricted ethnic diversity in human embryonic stem cells. Nature Methods 7(1):6-7. Impact factor 16.874 
  10. S. Adelia Lin, Gabriel Kolle, Sean Grimmond, Qi Zhou, Elizabeth Doust, Melissa H. Little, Bruce Aronow, Sharon D. Ricardo, Martin F. Pera, John F. Bertram and Andrew L. Laslett. (2010) Subfractionation of differentiating hES cell populations allows the isolation of a mesodermal population enriched for intermediate mesoderm and putative renal progenitors. Stem Cells and Development October 2010, 19(10): 1637-1648. Impact factor 4.791
  11. Louise C. Laurent, Igor Ulitsky, Ileana Slavin, Ha Tran, Andrew Schork, Robert Morey, Candace Lynch, Julie Harness, Sunray Lee, Maria J. Barrero, Marina Martynova, Franz-Josef Muller, Ruslan Semechkin, Vasiliy Galat, Joel Gottesfeld, Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, Chuck Murry, Hans Keirstead, Hyun-Sook Park, Ulrich Schmidt, Andrew L. Laslett, Caroline M. Nievergelt, Ron Shamir, Jeanne F. Loring (2011). Dynamic Changes in the Copy Number of Pluripotency and Cell Proliferation Genes in Human ES and iPS Cells during Reprogramming and Time in Culture. Cell Stem Cell 8(1):106-18. Impact factor 25.943.
  12. Naohisa Wada*, Bei Wang*, Ni-Hung Li, Andrew L. Laslett, Stan Gronthos, P. Mark Bartold. (2011) Establishment of induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament stem cells. Journal of Periodontal Research 46: 438–447 Impact factor 2.128* co-first authors12. 
  13. Bi Song, Samy Sakkal, Maliha A. Alikhan, Peter G. Kerr, Andrew L. Laslett, Claude A. Bernard and Sharon D. Ricardo (2011). Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human kidney mesangial cells. Journal of the American Society for Nephrology 22:1213-1220 Impact factor 8.288 
  14. Kolle G, Shepherd J, Gardiner B, Kassahn K, Cloonan N, Nourbakhsh E, Taylor DF, Wani S, Chy HS, Zhou, Q, McKernan K,  Kuersten S, Laslett AL, Grimmond, SM. (2011) Deep-transcriptome and ribonome sequencing redefines the molecular networks of pluripotency and the extracellular space in human embryonic stem cells. Genome Research 21(12):2014-25. Impact factor 13.588
  15. Raymond Ching-Bong Wong, Sara Pollan, Helen Fong, Abel Ibrahim, Ellen Smith, Mirabelle Ho, Andrew L. Laslett, Peter Donovan. Novel role of a RNA polymerase III subunit POLR3G in regulating pluripotency in human embryonic stem cells. Stem Cells 29 (10):1517-27. Impact factor 7.871
  16. The International Stem Cell Initiative: Katherine Amps, Peter W Andrews, George Anyfantis, Lyle Armstrong, Stuart Avery, Hossein Baharvand, Julie Baker, Duncan Baker, Maria Barbadillo Munoz, Stephen Beil, Nissim Benvenisty, Dalit Ben-Yosef, Juan-Carlos Biancotti, Alexis Bosman, Romulo Martin Brena, Daniel Brison, Gunilla Caisander, María Vicenta Camarasa, Jieming Chen Eric Chiao, Young Min Choi, Andre B H Choo, Daniel Collins, Alan Colman, Jeremy Micah Crook, George Q Daley, Anne Dalton, Paul A De Sousa, Chris Denning Janet Downie, Petr Dvorak, Karen Dyer Montgomery, Anis Feki, Angela Ford, Victoria Fox, Ana M Fraga, Tzvia Frumkin, Amparo Galán, Lin Ge, Paul J Gokhale, Tamar Golan-Lev, Hamid Gourabi, Michal Gropp, Lu Guangxiu, Ales Hampl, Katie Harron, Lyn Healy, Wishva Herath, Frida Holm, Outi Hovatta, Johan Hyllner, Maneesha S Inamdar, Astrid Kresentia Irwanto, Tetsuya Ishii, Marisa Jaconi, Ying Jin, Susan Kimber, Sergey Kiselev, Barbara B Knowles, Oded Kopper, Valeri Kukharenko, Anver Kuliev, Maria A Lagarkova, Peter W Laird, Majlinda Lako, Andrew L. Laslett, Neta Lavon, Dong Ryul Lee, Jeoung Eun Lee, Chunliang Li, Linda S Lim, Tenneille E Ludwig, Yu Ma, Edna Maltby, Ileana Mateizel, Yoav Mayshar, Maria Mileikovsky, Stephen L Minger, Takamichi Miyazaki, Shin Yong Moon, Harry Moore, Christine Mummery, Andras Nagy, Norio Nakatsuji, Kavita Narwani, Steve K W Oh, Sun Kyung Oh, Cia Olson, Timo Otonkoski, Fei Pan In-Hyun Park, Steve Pells, Martin Pera, Lygia V Pereira, Ouyang Qi, Grace Selva Raj, Benjamin Reubinoff, Alan Robins, Paul Robson, Janet Rossant, Ghasem H Salekdeh, Eva Sánchez, Thomas C Schulz, Karen Sermon, Jameelah Sheik Mohamed, Hui Shen, Eric Sherrer, Kuldip Sidhu, Carlos Simon Vallés, Shirani Sivarajah, Heli Skottman, Claudia Spits, Glyn Stacey, Raimund Strehl, Nick Strelchenko, Hirofumi Suemori, Bowen Sun, Riitta Suuronen, Kazutoshi Takahashi, Timo Tuuri, Parvathy Venu, Yuri Verlinsky, Dorien Ward-van Oostwaard, Daniel J Weisenberger, Yue Wu, Shinya Yamanaka, Lorraine Young & Qi Zhou. (2011) Screening a large, ethnically diverse population of human embryonic stem cells identifies a chromosome 20 minimal amplicon that confers a growth advantage. Nature Biotechnology 29(12):1132-44. Impact factor 31.090
  17. Kristopher L. Nazor, Gulsah Altun, Candace Lynch, Ha Tran, Julie V. Harness, Ileana Slavin, Ibon Garitaonandia, Franz Joseph Müller, Yu-Chieh Wang, Francesca S. Boscolo, Eyitayo Fakunle, Sunray Lee, Hyun Sook Park, Marina Martynova, Tsaiwei Ole, Darryl D.D'Lima, Ruslan Semechkin, Mana M. Parast, Vasiliy Galat, Andrew L. Laslett, Uli Schmidt, Hans S. Keirstead, Jeanne F. Loring, Louise C. Laurent (2012). Recurrent Variations in DNA Methylation in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells and their Differentiated Derivatives. Cell Stem Cell 10, 620–634 Impact factor 25.943

Dr Carmel O'Brien

View Dr Carmel O'Brien's Profile

Dr Carmel O'Brien

Research Scientist & Team Leader, Laslett Stem Cell Group CSIRO Materials and Science Engineering

induced, reprogramming, partial, ES, pluripotent, embryo, profiling, bioinformatic, somatic
Ask a Question View Website
  • Research Scientist & Team Leader, Laslett Stem Cell Group, CSIRO Materials and Science Engineering, CSIRO

Research interests

Dr O'Brien joined CSIRO in November 2009 as a deputy team leader in Dr Andrew Laslett’s human pluripotent stem cell biology research group. The focus of the group’s research is to validate and exploit the properties of human pluripotent stem cells derived from both embryos and reprogrammed somatic cells (iPS). While the characteristics of hPSCs make them potential sources of material for a wide range of clinical applications, they also pose potential risks from uncontrolled self-renewal and off-target cellular differentation.

The Laslett research group has developed a FACS-based immunotranscriptional profiling system for identifying and isolating human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) that express high levels of the cell surface antigens CD9 and GCTM-2. This profiling system identifes a refined genetic signature for both human ES and somatic cells reprogrammed to human iPS cells and provides a detailed understanding of the earliest events in human pluripotent stem cell differentiation. The group is using these methodologies and information to generate antibodies to novel epitopes on live hPSCs and using them to develop efficient and scaleable methods to produce highly enriched populations of live hPSCs that can be used as inputs for differentiation protocols and to remove residual pluripotent cells from target populations after differentiation. Also being developed are hPSC reporter lines that switch off more rapidyly that OCT4 or NANOG for use in hPSC maintenance assays and bioreactor beta-testing. As well, the reprogramming group is currently focused on generating iPS cell lines relevant for disease modelling studies and further, are exploring the observation that some human iPS cell lines display an intrinsic propensity to revert to pluripotency following spontaneous and directed differentiation in vitro.

Prior to joining CSIRO Dr O'Brien was a Senior Scientist and Program Manager with the biotechnology company Stem Cell Sciences Ltd., and a Senior Embryologist with Melbourne IVF, Monash IVF and the Mercy Hospital for Women.

Publications

  1. O’Brien, C., Lambshead, J., Chy, H., Zhou, G., Laslett, A.L.. 2nd Edition, Human Stem Cell Manual: A Laboratory Guide. Flow cytometry of human pluripotent stem cells. Eds J.F. Loring & S.E. Petersen. Elsevier publications (Invited chapter submitted July 2011). (COB and JL are co first-authors).
  2. Hook, L., O’Brien, C., Allsopp, T. (2005). ES cell technology: An introduction to genetic manipulation, differentiation and therapeutic cloning. Adv. Drug Deliv. Rev., 57(13), 1904-1917.
  3. Munsie, M.J., O’Brien, C.M., and Mountford, P.S. (2002). Transgenic strategy for demonstrating nuclear transfer in the mouse. Cloning and Stem Cells, 4(2), 121-130.
  4. Munsie, M.J., Michalska, A.E., O’Brien, C.M., Trounson, A.O. and Mountford, P.S. (2000). Isolation ofpluripotent embryonic stem cells from reprogrammed adult somatic cell nuclei. Curr. Biol., 10, 989-992.

Dr Dmitry Ovchinnikov

View Dr Dmitry Ovchinnikov's Profile

Dr Dmitry Ovchinnikov

Research Fellow, AIBN, The University of Queensland

Ask a Question  
  • Research Fellow, Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology

Research interests

Dmitry A. Ovchinnikov is currently a Research Fellow in the Stem Cell Engineering Group at the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology at the University of Queensland. His current research interests include the generation of transgenic ES and iPS research tools for bioengineering applications, approaches to control the undesirable de-differentiation and proliferation of stem cell-derived grafts, and the dissection of the roles of TGFβ superfamily signalling in stem cell biology and de-programming. In particular, he is utilizing both gene knockdown and overexpression approaches to dissect the roles of different branches of signalling cascades activated by these crucial in stem cell biology signalling factors. Previously, he led the Transgenic subgroup in the laboratory of Professor David Hume at the UQ’s Institute for Molecular Biosciences, where he has generated a number transgenic mouse tools for macrophage function and other in vivo studies. Dmitry received his Diploma in Biochemistry (Masters equivalent) from the M.V. Lomonosov’s Moscow State University in 1993. He completed his PhD studies in the laboratory of Professor Richard R. Behringer at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, where he performed some of the first conditional knockout studies in mice utilising the Cre/loxP system and addressing the role of BMP signalling in embryonic development.

Publications

TBA.

Dr Huseyin Sumer

View Dr Huseyin Sumer's Profile

Dr Huseyin Sumer

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Centre for Reproduction & Development, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Monash University, Victoria.

Ask a Question View Website
  • Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Centre for Reproduction & Development, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Monash University, Victoria.

Research interests include:

Dr Huseyin Sumer attended the University of Melbourne for his undergraduate studies. He obtained his PhD at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute at the University of Melbourne in Professor Andy Choo’s laboratory working on centromere biology. Following the successful completion of his PhD on the chromatin organisation of mammalian centromeres in 2004, he was awarded a National Health and Medical Research Council Peter Doherty Biomedical training fellowship to undertake stem cell research in Dr Paul Verma’s laboratory. There he has been working in the area of stem cells with a research interest in cell reprogramming. He is currently funded by the Dairy Futures CRC to utilize stem cell technology in cattle.

Publications:

  1. Kelly R.D., Sumer, H., McKenzie, M., Facucho-Oliveira, J., Trounce, I.A., Verma, P.J., St John, J.C. (in press) The Effects of Nuclear Reprogramming on Mitochondrial DNA Replication. Stem Cell Reviews and Reports.
  2. Malaver-Ortega, L.F., Sumer, H., Liu, J., Verma, P.J. (in press) The state of the art for pluripotent stem cells derivation in domestic ungulates. Theriogenology.
  3. Khodadadi, K., Sumer, H., Pashaiasl, M., Lim, S., Williamson, M.,and Verma. P.J, 2012, Induction of Pluripotency in Adult Equine Fibroblasts without c-MYC. Stem Cells International. 2012:429160.
  4. Heffernan, C., Sumer, H., Malaver-Ortega, L.F, Verma, P.J. 2012, Temporal Requirements of cMyc Protein for Reprogramming Mouse Fibroblasts. Stem Cells International. 2012:541014
  5. Liu, J., Balehosur, D., Murray, B., Kelly, J., Sumer, H., Verma, P., 2012, Generation and characterization of reprogrammed sheep induced pluripotent stem cells, Theriogenology , vol 77, issue 2, Elsevier Inc, United States, pp. 338-346.
  6. Sumer, H., Liu, J., Verma, P., 2011, Cellular reprogramming of somatic cells, Indian Journal of Experimental Biology , vol 49, issue 6, National Institute of Science Communication and Information Resources, India, pp. 409-415.
  7. Liu, J., Ashton, M., Sumer, H., O'Bryan, M., Brodnicki, T., Verma, P., 2011, Generation of stable pluripotent stem cells from NOD mouse tail-tip fibroblasts, Diabetes , vol 60, issue 5, American Diabetes Association, United States, pp. 1393-1398.
  8. Liu, J., Sumer, H., Leung, J., Upton, K., Dottori, M., Pebay, A., Verma, P., 2011, Late passage human fibroblasts induced to pluripotency are capable of directed neuronal differentiation, Cell Transplantation , vol 20, issue 2, Cognizant Communication Corp., United States, pp. 193-203.
  9. Sumer, H., Liu, J., Malaver, L., Lim, M., Khodadad, K., Verma, P., 2011, NANOG is a key factor for induction of pluripotency in bovine adult fibroblasts, Journal of Animal Science , vol 89, issue 9, American Society of Animal Science, United States, pp. 2708-2716.
  10. Tat, P., Sumer, H., Pralong, D., Verma, P., 2011, The efficiency of cell fusion-based reprogramming is affected by the somatic cell type and the in vitro age of somatic cells, Cellular Reprogramming , vol 13, issue 4, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Publishers, United States, pp. 331-344.
  11. Sanchez-Partida, L., Kelly, R., Sumer, H., Lo, C., Aharon, R., Holland, M., O'Bryan, M., St John, J., 2011, The generation of live offspring from vitrified oocytes, PLoS ONE , vol 6, issue 6 (Art. No: e21597), Public Library of Science, United States, pp. 1-11.
  12. Sumer, H., Nicholls, C., Liu, J., Tat, P., Liu, J., Verma, P., 2010, Comparison of reprogramming ability of mouse ES and iPS cells measured by somatic cell fusion, International Journal of Developmental Biology , vol 54, issue 11-12, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Spain, pp. 1723-1728.
  13. Sumer, H., Jones, K.L., Liu, J., Heffernan, C., Tat, P.A., Upton, K.R., Verma, P.J., 2010, Reprogramming of somatic cells after fusion with induced pluripotent stem cells and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells, Stem Cells and Development , vol 19, issue 2, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Publishers, United States, pp. 239-246.
  14. Tat, P., Sumer, H., Jones, K., Upton, K., Verma, P., 2010, The efficient generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from adult mouse adipose tissue-derived and neural stem cells, Cell Transplantation , vol 19, issue 5, Cognizant Communication Corp., United States, pp. 525-536.
  15. Sumer, H., Liu, J., Verma, P., 2010, The use of signalling pathway inhibitors and chromatin modifiers for enhancing pluripotency, Theriogenology , vol 74, issue 4, Elsevier Inc., United States, pp. 525-533.
  16. Sumer, H., Nicholls, C., Pinto, A.R.I., Indraharan, D., Liu, J., Lim, M.L., Liu, J., Verma, P.J., 2009, Chromosomal and telomeric reprogramming following ES-somatic cell fusion, Chromosoma , vol 5.111, Springer Berlin, Germany, pp. 1-10.
  17. Sumer, H., Liu, J., Tat, P.A., Heffernan, C., Jones, K.L., Verma, P.J., 2009, Somatic cell nuclear transfer: Pros and cons, Journal of Stem Cells , vol 4, issue 2, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., United States, pp. 85-93.
  18. Liu, J., Jones, K.L., Sumer, H., Verma, P.J., 2009, Stable transgene expression inhumanembryonic stem cells after simple chemical transfection, Molecular Reproduction And Development , vol 76, John Wiley & Sons, Inc, US, pp. 580-586.
  19. Sumer, H., Jones, K.L., Liu, J., Rollo, B., van Boxtel, A.L., Pralong, D.J., Verma, P.J., 2009, Transcriptional changes in somatic cells recovered from embryonic stem-somatic heterokaryons, Stem Cells and Development , vol 18, issue 9, Mary Ann Liebert Inc, United States, pp. 1361-1368.

Dr Jill L. Shepherd

View Dr Jill L. Shepherd's Profile

Dr Jill L. Shepherd

Postdoctoral scientist Freelance consultant

transcriptomics, epigenomics, bioinformatics
Ask a Question View Website
  • Postdoctoral Scientist
  • Freelance Consultant

Research interests

Dr Shepherd is interested in the questions surrounding the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of cell fate in terms of stem cell differentiation and somatic cell reprogramming. Her work involves applying high throughput transcriptomic and epigenomic techniques to address these sorts of problems within the context of in vitro stem cell systems and disease models. Recently Dr. Shepherd worked on the Stemformatics project, an ongoing collaborative effort between the stem cell research and bioinformatics communities aiming to improve accessibility, statistical interpretation and utility of genome-scale datasets for the advancement of stem cell genomics.

Dr Shepherd has recently taken a regulatory affairs position with the Human Tissue Authority (HTA) in London working on issues relating to cell therapy and regenerative medicine in the UK. She has a special interest in policy development around the clinical translation of human embryonic stem cell derivatives.

Publications

  1. Kolle G, Shepherd JL, Gardiner B, Kassahn K, Cloonan N, Wood DLA, Nourbaksh E, Taylor DF, Wani S, Chy HS, Zhou Q, McKernan K, Kuersten S, Laslett A, Grimmond SM. Deep-transcriptome and ribonome sequencing redefines the molecular networks of pluripotency and the extracellular space in human embryonic stem cells. Genome Res. 21(12):2014-25.2011.
  2. Shepherd JL, Gongora M, Heath PR, Holden H, Grimmond SM, Andrews PW, Moore HD. Mosaic expression of the pluripotency marker SSEA-3 correlates with altered cell cycle regulation within hESC colonies. Manuscript in preparation
  3. Shepherd JL, Avery K, Gongora M, Heath PR, Holden H, Grimmond SM, Moore HD. Transcriptional analysis of human embryonic stem cells and their differentiated counterparts cultured under feeder-free and feeder-dependent conditions. Manuscript in preparation.
  4. Avery K, Avery S, Shepherd JL, Heath PR, Moore HD. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates transcriptional regulation of key targets associated with survival, proliferation and pluripotency in human embryonic stem cells. Stem Cells Dev. 17:1195-1206. 2008.

Dr Jose M. Polo

View Dr Jose M. Polo 's Profile

Dr Jose M. Polo

Group Leader Reprogramming and Epigentics Laboratory, Monash Immunology and Stem Cell Laboratories (MISCL), Monash University

Ask a Question View Website
  • Group Leader, Reprogramming and Epigentics Laboratory, Monash Immunology and Stem Cell Laboratories (MISCL), Monash University

Research interests

Dr Polo's group is interested in the transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms that govern pluripotency and the reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. He is particularly interested in three aspects:

  1. The kinetics and universality of the epigenetic changes occurring during reprogramming
  2. The in vitro and in vivo plasticity potential of the generated cells; and
  3. The composition and assembly kinetics of transcriptional regulation complexes at pluripotency genes.

Using different molecular, biochemical and cellular techniques Dr Polo's lab is aiming to dissect the nature and dynamic of such events.

Publications

  1. Ohi Y, Qin H, Hong C, Blouin L, Polo JM, Guo T, Qi Z, Downey SL, Manos PD, Rossi DJ, Yu J, Hebrok M, Hochedlinger K, Costello JF, Song JS, Ramalho-Santos M.Incomplete DNA methylation underlies a transcriptional memory of somatic cells in human iPS cells. Nat Cell Biol. 2011 May;13(5):541-9;
  2. Polo JM, Liu S, Figueroa ME, Kulalert W, Eminli S, Tan KY, Apostolou E, Stadtfeld M, Li Y, Shioda T, Natesan S, Wagers AJ, Melnick A, Evans T, Hochedlinger K. “Cell type of origin influences the molecular and functional properties of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells. ” Nat Biotechnol. 2010 Aug;28(8):848-55
  3. Polo JM, Hochedlinger K. “When fibroblasts MET iPSCs” Cell Stem Cell. 2010 Jul 2;7(1):5-6
  4. Utikal J*, Polo JM*, Stadtfeld M, Maherali N, Kulalert W, Walsh RM, Khalil A, Rheinwald JG, Hochedlinger K. “Immortalization eliminates a roadblock during cellular reprogramming into iPS cells” Nature. 2009 Aug 27;460(7259):1145-8

Dr Juan Carlos Polanco

View Dr Juan Carlos Polanco's Profile

Dr Juan Carlos Polanco

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, c/o CSIRO-Stem Cells Group, Monash University, Clayton VIC 3800

Ask a Question View Website
  • Postdoctoral Research Fellow, CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, CSIRO

Research interests

Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) are considered to have an immense potential for regenerative medicine, and are a potential alternative to human embryonic stem cells (hESC). However, before that promise becomes a reality in the clinic, unwanted and worrying phenomena identified in the investigations with hiPSCs need to be understood with the aim of preventing and/or clearing these anomalies.

Our current work has identified novel unpublished observations showing that hIPSC exhibit a propensity to revert to a pluripotent phenotype after spontaneous or directed differentiation in vitro. This hIPSC instability was revealed using our published method to identify pluripotent and differentiated cells in standard human pluripotent stem cell cultures by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), based on expression of the cell surface markers TG30 and GCTM-2. Differentiated cells collected and cultured post-FACS from viral-derived hIPSC lines were unstable and re-acquired immunoreactivity to TG30 and GCTM-2, formed stem cell-like colonies and re-expressed pluripotency markers. Furthermore, differentiated cells that reverted to pluripotency generated teratomas in our mouse experiments, raising concerns regarding the safety of these hIPSC lines.

My current research interests are investigating the mechanism(s) responsible for the phenomenon of reversion to pluripotency in selected hIPSC lines.

Publications

TBA.

Dr Jun Liu

View Dr Jun Liu 's Profile

Dr Jun Liu

Monash Institute of Medical Research

somatic cell nuclear transfer; cell fusion; livestock iPSCs; genome editing
Ask a Question View Website
  • Monash Institute of Medical Research

Research interests

Dr Liu's research interests focus on:

  1. Generation of integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to develop safe, clinically relevant cells for cell therapy.
  2. Establishment of pluripotent embryo-derived cell lines from the NOD mouse (a non-permissive strain of mice), an animal model for the study of autoimmune disease such as Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Small molecule inhibitors of ERK1/2 and GSK3 signalling pathways, to isolate and maintain NOD ESCs with greater efficiency have been identified. Further research is aimed at investigating IDD candidate genes that have been linked with T1D.
  3. Exploring conditions to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in livestock, which provide a unique source of cells from large animals that allow specific traits to be engineered for agricultural or pharmaceutical purposes, and study developmental biology and regenerative medicine.

Publications

  1. Liu J, Balehosur D, Murray B, Kelly JM, Sumer H, Verma PJ. Generation and characterization of reprogrammed sheep induced pluripotent stem cells. Theriogenology 2011; (in press).
  2. Liu J, Aston MP, Sumer H, O’Bryan MK, Brodnicki TC, Verma PJ. Generation of pluripotent stem cells from Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse tail-tip fibroblasts. Diabetes 2011; 60:1393-1398.
  3. Liu J, Verma PJ, Evans-Galea M, Delatycki M, Michalska A, Leung J, Crombie D, Sarsero J, Williamson R, Dottori M, Pébay A. Generation and function of induced pluripotent stem cell lines from Friedreich Ataxia patients. Stem Cell Review and Report 2011; 7:703-713.
  4. Liu J, Sumer H, Leung J, Upton K, Dottori M, Pébay A, Verma PJ. Late passage human fibroblasts induced to pluripotency are capable of directed neuronal differentiation. Cell Transplantation 2011; 20:193-203.

Dr Keith Al-Hasani

View Dr Keith Al-Hasani's Profile

Dr Keith Al-Hasani

Senior Research Fellow, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute

Ask a Question  
  • Senior Research Fellow, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute

Research interests

  1. Type 1 Diabetes
  2. Regenerative Medicine
  3. Reprogramming progenitor and adult cells into insulin secreting cells.

Publications

  1. Al-Hasani K, Pfeifer A, Courtney M, Ben-Othman N, Gjernes E, Vieira A, Druelle N, Avolio F, Ravassard P, Leuckx G, Lacas-Gervais S, Ambrosetti D, Benizri E, Hecksher-Sorensen J, Gounon P, Ferrer J, Gradwohl G, Heimberg H, Mansouri A, Collombat P. Adult Duct-Lining Cells Can Reprogram into β-like Cells Able to Counter Repeated Cycles of Toxin-Induced Diabetes. Dev Cell. 2013 Jul 15;26(1):86-100.
  2. Hatfaludi T, Al-Hasani K, Gong L, Boyce JD, Ford M, Wilkie IW, Quinsey N, Dunstone MA, Hoke DE, Adler B. Screening of 71 P. multocida proteins for protective efficacy in a fowl cholera infection model and characterization of the protective antigen PlpE. PLoS One. 2012;7(7):e39973.
  3. Courtney M, Pfeifer A, Al-Hasani K, Gjernes E, Vieira A, Ben-Othman N, Collombat P. In vivo conversion of adult α-cells into β-like cells: a new research avenue in the context of type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2011 Oct;13 Suppl 1:47-52. doi: 10.1111/j.1463-1326.2011.01441.x. Review.
  4. Hatfaludi T, Al-Hasani K, Boyce JD, Adler B. Outer membrane proteins of Pasteurella multocida. Vet Microbiol. 2010 Jul 29;144(1-2):1-17. doi: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2010.01.027. Epub 2010 Feb 4. Review.
  5. Al-Hasani K, Navarro-Garcia F, Huerta J, Sakellaris H, Adler B. The immunogenic SigA enterotoxin of Shigella flexneri 2a binds to HEp-2 cells and induces fodrin redistribution in intoxicated epithelial cells. PLoS One. 2009 Dec 9;4(12):e8223. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0008223.
  6. Hatfaludi T, Al-Hasani K, Dunstone M, Boyce J, Adler B. Characterization of TolC efflux pump proteins from Pasteurella multocida. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2008 Nov;52(11):4166-71. doi: 10.1128/AAC.00245-08. Epub 2008 Aug 25.
  7. Myers GS, Parker D, Al-Hasani K, Kennan RM, Seemann T, Ren Q, Badger JH, Selengut JD, Deboy RT, Tettelin H, Boyce JD, McCarl VP, Han X, Nelson WC, Madupu R, Mohamoud Y, Holley T, Fedorova N, Khouri H, Bottomley SP, Whittington RJ, Adler B, Songer JG, Rood JI, Paulsen IT. Genome sequence and identification of candidate vaccine antigens from the animal pathogen Dichelobacter nodosus. Nat Biotechnol. 2007 May;25(5):569-75. Epub 2007 Apr 29.
  8. Al-Hasani K, Boyce J, McCarl VP, Bottomley S, Wilkie I, Adler B. Identification of novel immunogens in Pasteurella multocida. Microb Cell Fact. 2007 Jan 18;6:3.

Dr Kim Hynes

View Dr Kim Hynes 's Profile

Dr Kim Hynes

Research Scientist, Colgate Dental Research Centre, Dental School, University of Adelaide

Ask a Question View Website
  • Research Scientist, Colgate Dental Research Centre, Dental School, University of Adelaide

Research interests

Our research interests centre around the use of adult stem cell populations as novel treatement approches for periodontal disease. We particularly focus on the development and characterisation of iPS cells derived from the dental tissues of gingiva and periodontal ligament.

Publications

  1. Dibbens, L.M., Tarpey, P. S., Hynes, K., et al., X-linked protocadherin 19 mutations cause female limited epilepsy and cognitive impairment. Nat Genet, 2008. 40(6): p. 776-81.
  2. Hynes, K., et al., Epilepsy and mental retardation limited to females with PCDH19 mutations can present de novo or in single generation families. J Med Genet, 2009.

Dr Liang Qiao

View Dr Liang Qiao's Profile

Dr Liang Qiao

Senior Research Fellow/Senior Lecturer, Westmead Milennium Institute, Western Clinical School at the University of Sydney

Ask a Question View Website
  • Senior Research Fellow/Senior Lecturer, Westmead Milennium Institute, Western Clinical School at the University of Sydney

Research interests

Cancer, cancer stem cells, cell reprogramming, use if iPSCs in end stage liver diseases.

Publications

  1. Yun Dai, Hongmei Jiao, Guigen Teng, Weihong Wang, Rongxin Zhang, Yunhong Wang, Lionel Hebbard, Jacob George, Liang Qiao§. Embelin suppresses colitis-associated tumorigenesis by inhibiting IL-6/STAT3 signaling. Mol Cancer Thera (2013, in press).
  2. George S. Wilson, Aiping Tian, Lionel Hebbard, Wei Duan, Jacob George, Xun Li, Liang Qiao§. In Vitro Effects of the Janus kinase inhibitor Ruxolitinib in liver cancer. Cancer Letters (2013, in press).
  3. Hu Z, Liu X, Tang Z, Zhou Y, Qiao L§. Possible regulatory role of Snail in NF-κB-mediated changes in E-cadherin in gastric cancer. Oncol Rep 2013; 29 (3): 993-1000.
  4. Xiaojun Liu, Zhaofeng Chen, Hailong Li, Zenan Hu, Min Liu, Yuwei Ye, Yongning Zhou, Liang Qiao§. Effect of siRNA mediated knockdown of COX-2 and p65 on Snail and E-Cadherin in gastric cancer cells. World J Gastroenterol (2013, in press).
  5. Yong-qi Wang, Yu-min Li§, Xun Li, Tao Liu, Xiao-kang Liu, Jun-qiang Zhang, Ju-Wu Guo, Lin-yun Guo, Liang Qiao. A possible role of TGF-β1 promoter hypermethylation in gastric cancer.  World J Gastroenterol (2013, in press).
  6. George S. Wilson, Zenan Hu, Wei Duan, Aiping Tian, Xin M. Wang, Duncan McCleod, Vincent Lam, Jacob George, Liang Qiao. Efficacy of using cancer stem cell markers in isolating and characterising liver cancer stem cells. Stem Cells Dev 2013 Jun 8. [Epub ahead of print]
  7. Chen Z, Liu M, Liu X, Huang S, Li L, Song B, Li H, Ren Q, Hu Z, Zhou Y, Qiao L§. COX-2 regulates E-cadherin expression through the NF-κB/Snail signaling pathway in gastric cancer. Int J Mol Med 2013; 32(1):93-100.
  8. Shigdar S, Qiao L, Zhou SF, Xiang D, Wang T, Li Y, Lim LY, Kong L, Li L, Duan W. RNA aptamers targeting cancer stem cell marker CD133. Cancer Lett 2013; 330(1): 84-95. [PMID: 23196060]
  9. Vongsuvanh R, George J, Qiao L, Poorten DV. Visceral Adiposity In Gastrointestinal And Hepatic Carcinogenesis. Cancer Lett 2013; 330: (1)1-10.
     

Dr Megan Munsie

View Dr Megan Munsie's Profile

Dr Megan Munsie

Head of Education, Ethics, Law & Community Awareness Unit, Stem Cells Australia, University of Melbourne

Ask a Question  
  • Head of Education, Ethics, Law & Community Awareness Unit, Stem Cells Australia, University of Melbourne

Research interests

Dr Megan Munsie is a scientist who has combined her extensive technical expertise in stem cell science with an interest and understanding of the complex ethical, social and regulatory issues associated with stem cells in research and in the clinic. Dr Munsie is currently the Head of the Education, Ethics, Law & Community Awareness Unit at the ARC funded Stem Cells Australia initiative where her position is jointly funded by the University of Melbourne and Monash University.

Publications

  1. Fung R, Kerridge I, Skene L, Munsie M. 2012. Tempering hope with realism: induced pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine. Medical Journal of Australia. 196:622-625.
  2. Ahrlund-Richter L, De Luca M, Marshak DR, Munsie M, Veiga A Rao M. 2009. Isolation and production of cells suitable for human therapy: challenges ahead. Cell Stem Cell. 4:20-26.

Dr Meghan Thomas

View Dr Meghan Thomas's Profile

Dr Meghan Thomas

Director, Parkinson's Centre (ParkC)/Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Edith Cowan University

Ask a Question View Website
  • Director, Parkinson's Centre (ParkC)/Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Edith Cowan University

Research interests include:

  • Developmental genetics
  • Dopaminergic neurons
  • Treatment of neurodegenerative disease.

Publications:

  1. White RB, and Thomas MG. (2012) Moving beyond TH to define dopaminergic neurons for use in cell replacement therapies for Parkinson’s disease. Apr 4. CNS & Neurological Disorders – Drug Targets. [Epub ahead of print]
  2. Lam MMF, Thomas MG, Lind CRP. (2011) Neurosurgical convection-enhanced delivery of treatments for Parkinson’s disease. Journal of Clinical Neuroscience. 18(9):1163-7
  3. Thomas, M.G., Stone, L., Evill, L., Ong, S., Ziman, M., and Hool, L. (2011). Bone marrow stromal cells as replacement cells for Parkinson's disease: generation of an anatomical but not functional neuronal phenotype. Translational Research 157, 56-63.
  4. Bucks, R.S.,* Cruise, K.E.,* Skinner, T.C., Loftus, A.M., Barker, R.A., and Thomas, M.G. (2011). Coping processes and health-related quality of life in Parkinson's disease. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 26, 247-255. *equal first authors
  5. Cruise, K.E., Bucks, R.S., Loftus, A.M., Newton, R.U., Pegoraro, R., and Thomas, M.G. (2011). Exercise and Parkinson's: benefits for cognition and quality of life. Acta Neurol Scand 123, 13-19
  6. Thomas, M. (2010). Role of transcription factors in cell replacement therapies for neurodegenerative conditions. Regenerative Medicine 5, 441-450.
  7. Thomas, M., Tyers, P., Lazic, S.E., Caldwell, M.A., Barker, R.A., Beazley, L., and Ziman, M. (2009). Graft outcomes influenced by co-expression of Pax7 in graft and host tissue. Journal of Anatomy 214, 396-405
  8. Blake, J.A.,* Thomas, M.,* Thompson, J.A.,* White, R.,* and Ziman, M.* (2008). Perplexing Pax: from puzzle to paradigm. Developmental Dynamics 237, 2791-2803. *equal first authors
  9. Thomas, M.G., Barker, R.A., Beazley, L.D., and Ziman, M.R. (2007). Pax7 expression in the adult rat superior colliculus following optic nerve injury. Neuroreport 18, 105-109.
  10. Thomas, M., Beazley, L., and Ziman, M. (2006). A multiphasic role for Pax7 in tectal development. Experimental Brain Research 169, 266-271.
  11. Thomas, M., Lazic, S., Beazley, L., and Ziman, M. (2004). Expression profiles suggest a role for Pax7 in the establishment of tectal polarity and map refinement. Experimental Brain Research 156, 263-273.
  12. Ziman, M.R., Thomas, M., Jacobsen, P., and Beazley, L. (2001). A key role for Pax7 transcripts in determination of muscle and nerve cells. Experimental Cell Research 268, 220-229.

 

Dr Michael Edel

View Dr Michael Edel's Profile

Dr Michael Edel

Group Leader, Molecular Genetics Research Group, The University of Barcelona; Honorary Senior Research Fellow, University of Sydney

Ask a Question  
  • Group Leader, Molecular Genetics Research Group, The University of Barcelona
  • Honorary Senior Research Fellow, University of Sydney

Research interests

  1. Reprogramming cord blood and patient fibroblasts to iPS cells
  2. Cell cycle as a barrier to reprogramming
  3. Modeling human disease, neuronal and Cardiac disease
  4. Advancing the technology to make iPS cells
  5. Application of iPS cells: Towards the clinic.

Publications

  1. McLenachan S, Menchón C, Raya A, Consiglio A, Edel MJ. Cyclin a(1) is essential for setting the pluripotent state and reducing tumorigenicity of induced pluripotent stem cells. Stem Cells Dev. 2012 Oct 10;21(15):2891-9. doi: 10.1089/scd.2012.0190. Epub 2012 Jun 25.
  2. Menendez S, Camus S, Herreria A, Paramonov I, Morera LB, Collado M, Pekarik V, Maceda I, Edel M, Consiglio A, Sanchez A, Li H, Serrano M, Belmonte JC. Increased dosage of tumor suppressors limits the tumorigenicity of iPS cells without affecting their pluripotency. Aging Cell. 2012 Feb;11(1):41-50. doi: 10.1111/j.1474-9726.2011.00754.x. Epub 2011 Nov 10.
  3. Sánchez-Danés A, Consiglio A, Richaud Y, Rodríguez-Pizà I, Dehay B, Edel M, Bové J, Memo M, Vila M, Raya A, Izpisua Belmonte JC. Efficient generation of A9 midbrain dopaminergic neurons by lentiviral delivery of LMX1A in human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Hum Gene Ther. 2012 Jan;23(1):56-69. Epub 2011 Nov 17.
  4. Edel MJ, Menchon C, Vaquero JM, Izpisua Belmonte JC. A protocol to assess cell cycle and apoptosis in human and mouse pluripotent cells. Cell Commun Signal. 2011 Apr 11;9(1):8.
  5. Menchón C, Edel MJ, Izpisua Belmonte JC. The cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip¹ controls self-renewal and pluripotency of human embryonic stem cells by regulating the cell cycle, Brachyury and Twist. Cell Cycle. 2011 May 1;10(9):1435-47. Epub 2011 May 1.
  6. Edel MJ, Boué S, Menchon C, Sánchez-Danés A, Izpisua Belmonte JC. Rem2 GTPase controls proliferation and apoptosis of neurons during embryo development. Cell Cycle. 2010 Sep 1;9(17):3414-22. Epub 2010 Sep 11.
  7. Edel MJ, Menchon C, Menendez S, Consiglio A, Raya A, Izpisua Belmonte JC. Rem2 GTPase maintains survival of human embryonic stem cells as well as enhancing reprogramming by regulating p53 and cyclin D1. Genes Dev. 2010 Mar 15;24(6):561-73.

 

Dr Robert White

View Dr Robert White's Profile

Dr Robert White

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Edith Cowan University

Ask a Question View Website
  • Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Edith Cowan University

Research interests include:

  • Developmental genetics
  • Dopaminergic neurons
  • Treatment of neurodegenerative disease.

Publications:

  1. White RB, and Thomas MG. (2012) Moving beyond TH to define dopaminergic neurons for use in cell replacement therapies for Parkinson’s disease. Apr 4. CNS & Neurological Disorders – Drug Targets. [Epub ahead of print]
  2. Gnocchi VF, Scharner J, Huang Z, Brady K, Lee JS, White RB, Morgan JE, Sun Y-B, Ellis JA and Zammit PS (2011) Uncoordinated Transcription and Compromised Muscle Function in the Lmna-null Mouse Model of Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy. PLoS ONE 6(2): doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0016651
  3. White, R.B. (2011) Looks like a duck, quacks like a duck....still behaves like a Bone Marrow Stromal Cell. Translational Research. 157 (2):53-5.
  4. White, R.B., Bierinx, A.B., Gnocchi, V.F., and Zammit, P.S. (2010) Dynamics of muscle fibre growth during postnatal mouse development. BMC Developmental Biology:10(21). doi:10.1186/1471-213X-10-21
  5. Gnocchi VF, White RB, Ono Y, Ellis, J and Zammit PS (2009). Further Characterisation of the Molecular Signature of Quiescent and Activated Mouse Muscle Satellite Cells. PLoS ONE:4(4). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0005205
  6. Collins, C.A., Gnocchi, V.F., White, R.B., Boldrin, L., Perez-Ruiz, A., Relaix, F., Morgan, J.E., and Zammit, P.S. (2009) Integrated functions of Pax3 and Pax7 in the regulation of proliferation, cell size and myogenic differentiation. PLoS ONE: 4(2): e4475. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0004475.
  7. White, R.B., and Ziman, M.R. (2008) Genome-widediscovery of Pax7 target genes during development. Physiological Genomics: 33: 41-49.
  8. Blake, J.A., Thomas, M.G., Thompson, J.A., White, R.B., and Ziman, M.R. (2008) Perplexing Pax: From Puzzle to Paradigm. Developmental Dynamics: 237: 2791-2803.
  9. White, R.B., and Ziman, M.R. (2006) A comparative analysis of shotgun-cloning and tagged-random amplification-cloning of chromatin immunoprecipitation-isolated genome fragments. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications: 346: (2) 479-483.

Dr Teresa Holm

View Dr Teresa Holm's Profile

Dr Teresa Holm

Post-doctoral research fellow, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, University of Auckland

Ask a Question  View Website
  • Post-doctoral research fellow, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, University of Auckland

Research interests

Generation of human iPS cells from patients with kidney disease.

Publications

  1. Cuong Q. Diep, Dongdong Ma, Rahul C. Deo, Teresa M. Holm, Richard W. Naylor, Natasha Arora, Rebecca A. Wingert, Frank Bollig, Gordana Djordjevic, Benjamin Lichman, Hao Zhu, Takanori Ikenaga, Fumihito Ono, Christoph Englert, Chad A. Cowan, Neil A. Hukriede, Robert I. Handin, Alan J. Davidson. Identification of adult nephron progenitors capable of kidney regeneration in zebrafish. Nature. 2011 Feb 3;470(7332):95-100.
  2. Holm TM, Jackson-Grusby L, Brambrink T, Yamada Y, Rideout WM 3rd, Jaenisch R. Global loss of imprinting leads to widespread tumorigenesis in adult mice. Cancer Cell. 2005 Oct;8(4):275-285.
  3. Derjuga A, Gourley TS, Holm TM, Heng HH, Shivdasani RA, Ahmed R, Andrews NC, Blank V. (2004) Complexity of CNC transcription factors as revealed by gene targeting of the Nrf3 locus. Mol Cell Biol. 8:3286-3294.
  4. Braun A, Zhang S, Miettinen HE, Ebrahim S, Holm TM, Vasile E, Post MJ, Yoerger DM, Picard MH, Krieger JL, Andrews NC, Simons M, Krieger M. (2003) Probucol prevents early coronary heart disease and death in the high-density lipoprotein receptor SR-BI/apolipoprotein E double knockout mouse. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100:7283-7288.
  5. Holm TM, Braun A, Trigatti BL, Brugnara C, Sakamoto M, Krieger M, Andrews NC. (2002) Failure of red blood cell maturation in mice with defects in the high-density lipoprotein receptor SR-BI. Blood 99:1817-24.

Professor  Justin Cooper-White

View Professor  Justin Cooper-White's Profile

Professor Justin Cooper-White

AIBN Group Leader, Smart surfaces, scaffolds and diagnostic microdevices

Tissue engineering; Bioreactors; Smart surfaces; Delivery; Microenvironment; Single cell analysis
Ask a Question View Website
  • Director, Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF), Queensland Node
  • Group Leader, Tissue Engineering and Microfluidics Laboratory, Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology
  • Associate Dean (Research), Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and IT, The University of Queensland

Research interests

Professor Justin Cooper-White's research interests include the development of novel biomaterials and engineered surfaces for tissue engineered cartilage, bone, cardiac muscle and vascular systems, microbioreactors for stem cell expansion and differentiation, microfluidic devices for biofluid property measurement and early disease detection and the manufacture of microparticle delivery systems.

Publications

  1. Rowlands Andrew S; George Peter A; Cooper-White Justin J., ‘Directing osteogenic and myogenic differentiation of MSCs: interplay of stiffness and adhesive ligand presentation.’ American Journal of Physiology. Cell Physiology 295(4), C1037-44 2008.
  2. George, P.A., Doran, M.R., Croll, T.I., Munro, T.P., Cooper-White, J.J., Nanoscale presentation of cell adhesive molecules via block copolymer self-assembly. Biomaterials, 30(27) 4732-4737 2009.
  3. Titmarsh, D., Cooper-White, J.J., Microbioreactor array for full-factorial analysis of provision of multiple soluble factors in cellular microenvironments. Biotechnol. Bioeng., 104(6) 1240-1244 2009.
  4. Doran, M.R., Markway, B.D., Croll, T.I., Sara, S., Munro, T.P., Cooper-White, J.J., Controlled presentation of recombinant proteins via a zinc-binding peptide-linker in two and three dimensional formats. Biomaterials, 30(34) 6614-6620 2009.
  5. Cameron, Andrew.R., Frith, Jessica.E., Cooper-White, Justin.J. The influence of substrate creep on mesenchymal stem cell behaviour and phenotype. Biomaterials, 2011.
  6. Hudson, J.E., Mills, R.J., Frith, J.E., Brooke, G., Jaramillo-Ferrada, P., Wolvetang, E.J., Cooper-White, J.J., A Defined Media and Substrate for Expansion of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Progenitors that Enriches for Osteo- and Chondro-genic Precursors, in Press, Stem Cells and Development, 20 (1), pp. 77-87 2011.
  7. Prowse, A.B.J., Doran, M.R., Cooper-White, J.J., Chong, F., Munro, T.P., Fitzpatrick, J., Chung, T.-L., Haylock, D.N., Gray, P.P., Wolvetang, E.J. Long term culture of human embryonic stem cells on recombinant vitronectin in ascorbate free media (2010) Biomaterials, 31 (32), pp. 8281-8288.

Professor Andrew C. W. Zannettino

View Professor Andrew C. W. Zannettino's Profile

Professor Andrew C. W. Zannettino

Chief Medical Scientist Head, Myeloma Research Laboratory and Co-Head, Regenerative Medicine Program Department of Haematology, SA Pathology, Frome Road, Adelaide 5000 SA Member, Centre for Stem Cell Research, Robinson Institute, University of Adelaide, SA and Member, Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, SA.

Ask a Question View Website
  • Chief Medical Scientist and Head, Myeloma Research Laboratory and Co-Head, Regenerative Medicine Program, Department of Haematology, SA Pathology
  • Member, Centre for Stem Cell Research, Robinson Institute, University of Adelaide
  • Member, Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology

Research interests

Mesenchymal Precursor/Stem Cell (MPC) therapy is emerging as the new paradigm for treating and potentially curing many human diseases. MPCs are non-hematopoietic progenitor cells which possess multi-lineage differentiation potential and have the ability to augment tissue repair. Using pre-clinical animal models of human disease, Prof. Zannettino's group has shown that placement of MPCs into the disease/damaged tissue environment promotes endogenous tissue repair. While their mechanism of action remains to be completely defined, studies suggest that MPCs are a source trophic factors that exert multiple effects, including the recruitment of the body’s own tissue specific precursor cells, promotion of blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) and inhibition of apoptosis.

Specific research interests are:

  1. To identify MPC-derived factors that promote tissue repair/regeneration;
  2. To identify the role played by the mTOR signalling pathways in promoting MPC differentiation;
  3. To assess the efficacy of MPC to promote cardiac, bone repair and cartilage repair in pre-clinical animal models of disease;
  4. To assess the efficacy of MPC therapy to inhibit cancer growth in an animal model of the haematological malignancy, multiple myeloma.

Publications

  1. Goldschlager T, Ghosh P, Zannettino A, Williamson M, Rosenfeld JV, Itescu S, Jenkin G. A comparison of mesenchymal precursor cells and amnion epithelial cells for enhancing cervical interbody fusion in an ovine model. Neurosurgery. 2011 Apr;68(4):1025-34; discussion 1034-5.
  2. Field JR, McGee M, Stanley R, Ruthenbeck G, Papadimitrakis T, Zannettino A, Gronthos S, Itescu S. The efficacy of allogeneic mesenchymal precursor cells for the repair of an ovine tibial segmental defect. Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol. 2011;24(2):113-21. Epub 2011 Jan 11.
  3. See F, Seki T, Psaltis PJ, Sondermeijer HP, Gronthos S, Zannettino AC, Govaert KM, Schuster MD, Kurlansky PA, Kelly DJ, Krum H, Itescu S. Therapeutic Effects of Human STRO-3-Selected Mesenchymal Precursor Cells and their Soluble Factors in Experimental Myocardial Ischemia. J Cell Mol Med. 2010 Dec 14. doi: 10.1111/j.1582-4934.2010.01241.x. [Epub ahead of print]
  4. Psaltis PJ, Carbone A, Nelson AJ, Lau DH, Jantzen T, Manavis J, Williams K, Itescu S, Sanders P, Gronthos S, Zannettino AC, Worthley SG. Reparative effects of allogeneic mesenchymal precursor cells delivered transendocardially in experimental nonischemic cardiomyopathy. JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2010 Sep;3(9):974-83.
  5. Psaltis PJ, Paton S, See F, Arthur A, Martin S, Itescu S, Worthley SG, Gronthos S, Zannettino AC. Enrichment for STRO-1 expression enhances the cardiovascular paracrine activity of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cell populations. J Cell Physiol. 2010 May;223(2):530-40.
  6. Goldschlager T, Ghosh P, Zannettino A, Gronthos S, Rosenfeld JV, Itescu S, Jenkin G. Cervical motion preservation using mesenchymal progenitor cells and pentosan polysulfate, a novel chondrogenic agent: preliminary study in an ovine model. Neurosurg Focus. 2010 Jun;28(6):E4. PubMed PMID: 20521963.

Professor Claude Bernard

View Professor Claude Bernard's Profile

Professor Claude Bernard

Deputy Director Monash Immunology and stem cell Laboratories Monash University & Head, Multiple Sclerosis Research Group, Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute, Monash University

Multiple sclerosis, cellular neuroscience, neurodegenerative disorders, neural stem cells, neural differentiation, demyelination, central nervous system, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, neuroimmunology
Ask a Question View Website
  • Deputy Director, Monash Immunology and Stem Cell Laboratories, Monash University
  • Head, Multiple Sclerosis Research Group, Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute, Monash University

Research interests

The major focus of the Neuroimmunology Laboratory is to study in human and experimental animals, facets of immunology, genetics, biochemistry and microbiology pertaining to the causation of various acute, progressive and destructive neurological disorders such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The major objective of Prof. Bernard's research is to understand the basic underpinnings of MS and attempt to translate these findings to developments that combine the rapidly evolving multi potential applications of stem cells with unique technology platforms that bridge immunology, autoimmunity and stem cell research to provide new therapeutic strategies for people with MS.

Publications

  1. Courtney McDonald, Christopher Siatskas and Claude C.A. Bernard: The emergence of amnion epithelial stem cells for the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis. Inflammation and Regeneration, (2011). 31: 256-271.
  2. Payne, N., Siatskas, C. Barnard, A. and C. C.A. Bernard. Stem cells as multi-faceted purveyors of immune modulation, repair and regeneration in multiple sclerosis. Current Stem Cell Research and Therapy. 2011; 6:50-62.
  3. Chris Siatskas and Claude C.A. Bernard, Stem cell and gene therapeutic strategies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Current Molecular Medicine. 2010; 9: 992-1016
  4. Bi Song, Maliha A. Alikhan, Samy Sakkal, Jonathan C. Niclis, Aude Sylvain, Peter G. Kerr, Andrew L. Laslett, Claude C. A. Bernard and Sharon D. Ricardo. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human kidney mesangial cells. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. (2011). 22: 1213–1220.
  5. Philip Heraud, Sally Caine, Naomi Campanale, Tara Karnezis, Mark J. Tobin, Donald McNaughton, Bayden R. Wood and Claude C.A. Bernard. Early detection of biomolecular, structural and pathological changes in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. NeuroImage. 2010; 49: 1180-1189

Professor Colin W Pouton

View Professor Colin W Pouton's Profile

Professor Colin W Pouton

Head of the Department of Pharmaceutical Biology (Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences), Exec Member Drug Discovery Biology Theme (MIPS), Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Science

Ask a Question View Website
  • Head of the Department of Pharmaceutical Biology (Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences), Exec Member Drug Discovery Biology Theme (MIPS), Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Science

Research interests

  1. Use of patient-derived iPS cells as models of Parkinson’s, Alzheimers diseases and psychosis
  2. Use of iPS cells to derive mouse models of cells of origin in cancer.

Publications

  1. Pouton CW, Haynes JM (2007). Embryonic stem cells as a source of models for drug discovery. Nat Rev Drug Discov  6(8):605-616. [citations = 57]
  2. Raye WS, Tochon-Danguy N, Pouton CW, Haynes JM (2007). Heterogeneous population of dopaminergic neurons derived from mouse embryonic stem cells: preliminary phenotyping based on receptor expression and function. Eur J Neurosci  25(7):1961-1970.  [citations = 9]
  3. Khaira SK, Pouton CW, Haynes JM (2009). P2X2, P2X4 and P2Y1 receptors elevate intracellular Ca2+ in mouse embryonic stem cell-derived GABAergic neurons. Br J Pharmacol  158(8):1922-1931.
  4. Chen QZ, Jin LY, Cook WD, Mohn D, Lagerqvist EL, Elliott DA, Haynes JM, Boyd N, Stark WJ, Pouton CW, Stanley EG, Elefanty AG (2010). Elastomeric nanocomposites as cell delivery vehicles and cardiac support devices.  Soft Matter  6(19):4715-4726.
  5. Goulburn AL, Alden D, Davis RP, Micallef SJ, Ng ES, Yu QC, Lim SM, Soh CL, Elliott DA, Hatzistavrou T, Bourke J, Watmuff B, Lang RJ, Haynes JM, Pouton CW, Giudice A, Trounson AO, Anderson SA, Stanley EG, Elefanty AG (2011). A Targeted NKX2.1 Hesc Reporter Line Enables Identification of Human Basal Forebrain Derivatives. Stem Cells 29: 462-473.
  6. Lagerqvist EL, Finnin BA, Pouton CW, Haynes JM (2011). Endothelin-1 and angiotensin II modulate rate and contraction amplitude in a subpopulation of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte-containing bodies. Stem Cell Res 6(1):23-33.
  7. Khaira SK, Nefzger CM, Beh SJ, Pouton CW, Haynes JM (2011) Midbrain and forebrain patterning delivers immunocytochemically and functionally similar populations of neuropeptide Y containing GABAergic neurons. Neurochem Int 59: 413-420
  8. Nefzger CM, Haynes JM, Pouton CW (2011) Directed expression of gata2, mash1, and foxa2 synergize to induce the serotonergic neuron phenotype during in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells. Stem Cells 29: 928-939

Professor Martin Pera

View Professor Martin Pera's Profile

Professor Martin Pera

Professor Stem Cell Sciences, University of Melbourne; Program Leader, Stem Cells Australia

Ask a Question View Website

  • Professor Stem Cell Sciences, University of Melbourne; Program Leader, Stem Cells Australia

Research interests

Professor Martin Pera is the Program Leader of Stem Cells Australia. He has over 25 years experience in human pluripotent stem cell research and has authored over 100 peer reviewed publications. Pera was among a small number of researchers who pioneered the isolation and characterisation of pluripotent stem cells from human germ cell tumours of the testis, work that provided an important framework for the development of human embryonic stem cells.

His laboratory at Monash University was the second in the world to isolate embryonic stem cells from the human blastocyst, and the first to describe their differentiation into somatic cells in vitro. He has made major contributions to the understanding of human embryonic stem cell biology and has helped many trainees and collaborators to establish themselves in this area of research. He has provided extensive advice to state, national and international regulatory authorities on the scientific background to human embryonic stem cell research, and is a member of the Steering Group of the International Stem Cell Initiative. Most recently, Professor Martin Pera was Head of the Eli and Edythe Broad Centre for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at the University of Southern California.

Development of new culture systems for human embryonic stem cells and study of growth factors involved in stem cell maintenance, cell cycle traverse and survival. Characterisation and control of early differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. Isolation, propagation and characterization of neural progenitor cells and endodermal progenitor cells from human embryonic stem cells. Isolation of early precursors of nephrogenic mesenchyme from early human ES cells. Development of high throughput methodology for screening of factors active on human pluripotent stem cells. Development of methodology for control of genetic stability of human hESC cells.

Publications

  1. Tam PPL, Pera M. 2013. Stem cell science and regenerative medicine. Bioessays. 35:147-148
  2. Hasegawa K, Miyabayashi T, Lutzko C, Pera M, Kahn M, Yasuda S-Y, Teo J-L, Nguyen C, McMillan M, Hsieh C-L, Suemori H, Nakatsuji N, Yamamoto M. 2012. Wnt Signaling Orchestration with a Small Molecule DYRK Inhibitor Provides Long-Term Xeno-Free Human Pluripotent Cell Expansion. Stem Cells Translational Medicine. 1:18-28.
  3. Hasegawa K, Pomeroy JE, Pera M. 2010. Current Technology for the Derivation of Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Human Embryos. Cell Stem Cell. 6:521-531.
  4. Pera M, Tam PPL. 2010. Extrinsic regulation of pluripotent stem cells. Nature. 465:713-720.
  5. Lin S, Bertram J, Lasett A, Kolle G, Grimmond S, Zhou Q, Doust E, Little M, Aronow B, Ricardo S, Pera M. 2010. Subfractionation of Differentiating Human Embryonic Stem Cell Populations Allows the Isolation of a Mesodermal Population Enriched for Intermediate Mesoderm and Putative Renal Progenitors. Stem Cells and Development. 19:1637-1648.
  6. Chung T, Brena R, Kolle G, Grimmond S, Berman B, Laird P, Pera M, Wolvetang E. 2010. Vitamin C Promotes Widespread Yet Specific DNA Demethylation of the Epigenome in Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Stem Cells. 28:1848-1855.

 

Professor Melissa Little

View Professor Melissa Little's Profile

Professor Melissa Little

Group Leader, IMB Kidney Research Laboratory, NHMRC Principal Research Fellow, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland

Ask a Question View Website
  • Group Leader, IMB Kidney Research Laboratory, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland
  • NHMRC Principal Research Fellow

Research interests

The prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease is climbing at 6-8% per annum with diabetic nephropathy now the leading cause of chronic kidney disease in most developed nations and some developing nations. Despite this, treatment options remain restricted to transplantation and dialysis. Professor Little'sresearch laboratory focuses on the development of alternative therapeutic options through advanced understanding of the normal processes of kidney development, injury and repair. The kidney is not regarded as a highly regenerative organ. Indeed, the functional filtration units of the kidney are all formed by the time you reach birth. Hence, research is focussed on a number of approaches. The first is to investigate adult kidney mesenchymal stem cell populations so as to investigate what role these cells play in regulating normal responses to injury and how they might be able to improve repair. The other approach is to look at directed differentiation of ES/iPS cells or reprogramming of adult cells to the nephron stem cell state of the developing kidney, from where the hope is to be able to generate new nephrons.

Publications

  1. Pelekanos R, Gongora M, Li J, Chandrakanthan V, Suhaimi N, Scown J, Brooke G, Christensen ME, Rice A, Osborne G, Grimmond SM, Harvey RP, Atkinson K, Little MH,. Comprehensive transcriptome and immunophenotype analysis of renal and cardiac MSC-like populations supports strong congruence with bone marrow MSC despite maintenance of distinct identities. Stem Cell Research (In Press, accepted August 2011)
  2. Lin SA, Kolle G, Grimmond SM, Zhou G, Doust E, Little MH, Aronow B, Ricardo S, Pera MF, Bertram JF, Laslett AL. Subfractionation of differentiating hES populations allows the isolation of a mesodermal population enriched for intermediate mesoderm and renal progenitors. (2010) Stem Cells and Development 19(10):1637-48
  3. Lusis M, Li J, Ineson J, Li J, Little MH. Isolation and culture of metanephric mesenchyme-derived nephrospheres reinforces evidence that embryonic renal progenitors are multipotent and exhaust during cessation of nephron formation. (2010) Stem Cell Research 5(1):23-39
  4. Little MH and Challen GA. Potential of the side population in regenerative nephrology. Book Chapter. Regenerative Nephrology. (commissioned book chapter) (2010) pp173-188
  5. Hendry C, Rumballe BA, Moritz K, Little MH. Defining and redefining the nephron progenitor population. (2011) Pediatric Nephrology 26(9):1395-406
  6. Hopkins C, Li J, Rae F, Little MH. Stem cell options for kidney disease.J. Pathology (2009) 217(2):265-81
  7. Challen GA, Ivan Bertoncello I, Deane J, Ricardo S & Little MH. Kidney side population cells represent a non-haematopoietic but heterogeneous population with multilineage and renal potential. (2006) J. Amer. Society Nephrol. 17(7):1896-912.

Professor Nicholas Fisk

View Professor Nicholas Fisk's Profile

Professor Nicholas Fisk

Executive Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Queensland, and a maternal-fetal medicine specialist at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital

Epithelial mesenchymal transition, mesengenesis, osteogenesis, iPS-derived MSC
Ask a Question View Website
  • Executive Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Queensland, Research Group Leader, The University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research
  • Maternal-fetal Medicine Specialist, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital

Research interests

Professor Fisk's research interests focus on the developmental ontogeny of fetal and perinatal mesenchymal and endothelial stem cells and their contribution to maternal and fetal tissue repair. In particular he seeks to address how stem cell populations can be optimised and delivered to maximise the therapeutic effect, focussing on bone repair and intrauterine transplantation models in congenital disorders. Given the pragmatic and ethical constraints on scaling up supply of fetal stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells have been generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells through manipulation of TGF-beta family receptors and epithelial mesenchymal transition. This system is being manipulated in an attempt to achieve either partial reprogramming without true pluripotency and/or differentiation from iPS of developmentally immature 'fetal-like' mesenchymal stem cells.

Publications

  1.  Guillot PV, Abass O, Bassett JH, Shefelbine SJ, Bou-Gharios G, Chan J, Kurata H, Williams GR, Polak J, Fisk NM: Intrauterine transplantation of human fetal mesenchymal stem cells from first trimester blood repairs bone and reduces fractures in osteogenesisimperfecta mice. Blood 111:1717-1725, 2008.
  2. Götherström C, Chan J, O’Donoghue K, Fisk NM: Identification of candidate surface antigens for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis by comparative global gene expression on human fetal mesenchymal stem cells. Molecular Human Reproduction 2010, 16: 472-480, 2010.
  3. Lee ESM, Bou-Gharios G, Seppanen E, Khosrotehrani K, Fisk NM: Fetal Stem Cell Microchimerism: Natural Born Healers or Killers? Molecular Human Reproduction 2010, 16: 869-78, 2010.
  4. Bou-Gharios G, Amin F, Hill P, Nakamura H, Maxwell P, Fisk NM. Microchimeric fetal cells are recruited to maternal kidney following injury and activate collagen type I transcription. Cells Tissues Organs. 2011;193:379–392.

Professor P. Mark Bartold AM

View Professor P. Mark Bartold AM's Profile

Professor P. Mark Bartold AM

Director, Colgate Australian Clinical Dental Research Centre, University of Adelaide, Department of Dentistry

iPS, periodontal disease, periodontal regeneration, mesenchymal induction
Ask a Question View Website
  • Director, Colgate Australian Clinical Dental Research Centre, University of Adelaide

Research interests

The use of periodontal mesenchymal stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells derived from periodontal tissues for use in periodontal regeneration using tissue engineering principles. Currently, large animal (sheep) and small animal (rat) model for these studies are used in which periodontal defects are surgically created and then the stem cells are surgically implanted into the site on various biocompatible scaffolds. Tissue regeneration is assessed by CT scanning, histological assessment and image analysis. Also under investigation are fundamental aspects of stem cell differentiation and factors which might control such processes.

Publications

  1. Mrozik K, Zilm PS, Bagley CJ, Hack S, Hoffman P, Gronthos S, Bartold PM. Proteomic characterization of mesenchymal stem cell-like populations derived from periodontal ligament, dental pulp and bone marrow: analysis of differentially expressed proteins Stem Cells and Development 19: 1485-1499; 2010.
  2. Menicanin D, Bartold PM, Zannettino ACW, Gronthos S. Identification of a common gene expression signature associated with immature clonal mesenchymal cell populations derived from bone marrow and dental tissues. Stem Cells & Development 19: 1501-1510; 2010.
  3. Wada N, Bartold PM, Gronthos S. Human Foreskin Fibroblasts Exert Immunomodulatory Properties by a Different Mechanism to Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells. Stem Cells and Devlopment 20:647-659; 2011.
  4. Wada N, Wang B, LinN-H, Laslett AL, Gronthos S, Bartold PM. Induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from human gingival and periodontal ligament fibroblasts Journal of Periodontal Research 46: 438-447; 2011.

Professor Patrick Tam

View Professor Patrick Tam's Profile

Professor Patrick Tam

Head of Embryology Unit and Deputy Director, Children's Medical Research Institute

Epiblast Stem cells; Lineage specification; Endoderm differentiation; Regulation of pluripotency
Ask a Question View Website
  • Head of Embryology Unit and Deputy Director, Children's Medical Research Institute

Research interests

Professor Tam's research focuses on the elucidation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of body patterning during embryonic development. The embryological studies have revealed a detailed blueprint of development in a series of fate maps that describe the origin of the progenitors of fetal tissues and the organisation of the basic body plan that serves as the blueprint of embryonic development. The knowledge of cell lineage differentiation during early embryogenesis also laid the foundation of the experimental paradigms for directing stem cell differentiation for the application of cell based therapy in regenerative medicine.

Current work focuses on the characterization of the biological properties of pluripotent stem cells derived from post-implantation mouse embryos and the induced pluripotent stem cells that harbor mutation of genes for signalling activity and transcriptional control of endoderm and mesoderm differentiation.

Publications

  1. Loebel DAF, Studdert JB, Power M, Radziewic T, Jones V, Coultas L, Jackson Y, Rao RS, Steiner K, Fossat N, Robb L and Tam PPL (2011) Rhou maintains the epithelial architecture and facilitates differentiation of the foregut endoderm. Development doi:10.1242/dev.063867
  2. Pera M and Tam P P L (2010) Extrinsic regulation of pluripotent stem cells. Nature 465: 713-720
  3. Fossat N, Jones V, Khoo P-L, Bogani D, Hardy A, Steiner K, Mukhopadhyay M, Westphal H, Nolan PM, Arkell R and Tam PPL (2011)Stringent requirement of a proper level of canonical WNT signalling activity for head formation in mouse embryo Development 138, 667-676 (doi10.1242/dev052803)

Professor Patrick Warnke

View Professor Patrick Warnke's Profile

Professor Patrick Warnke

Professor of Surgery, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon/Plastic Surgeon, Director of The Clem Jones Research Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Therapies Bond University, Queensland Health

Translational surgery Maxillofacial surgery in vivo tissue engineering endocultivation biomaterials extracellular matrix
Ask a Question View Website
  • Professor of Surgery, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon/Plastic Surgeon
  • Director of The Clem Jones Research Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Therapies Bond University, Queensland Health

Research interests

Dr Patrick Warnke is an internationally-renowned stem cell researcher and plastic surgeon who created world headlines after leading a research team that succeeded in 'growing' a new jawbone for a cancer sufferer using the patient's own stem cells.

In 2007, Dr Warnke launched the revolutionary MyJoint program in Germany - a cutting edge tissue engineering network comprising researchers and practitioners from leading institutions worldwide who are focussed on developing technologies that will enable patients to use their own bodies as 'bio-reactors' to grow replacement bones and organs. Dr Warnke continues his role in this ground-breaking medical field, drawing Bond University's Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine into the global MyJoint collaboration.

In addition to Dr Warnke's extensive research and publication portfolio, he has devoted many years to teaching through lectures, clinical skills training and thesis supervision, winning an award in 2006 for the Best Student Lectures of the Year within the Medical Faculty of the Christian-Albrecht's-University in Germany.

Publications

  1. Warnke PH, Springer IN, Wiltfang J, Acil Y, Eufinger H, Wehmoller M, Russo PA, Bolte H, Sherry E, Behrens E, Terheyden H: Growth and transplantation of a custom vascularised bone graft in a man. Lancet. 2004 Aug 28;364(9436):766-70.
  2. Warnke PH, Wiltfang J, Springer IN, Acil, Y, Bolte H, Kosmahl M, Russo PAJ, Sherry E, Lützen U, Wolfart S, Terheyden H: Man as Living Bioreactor: Fate of an exogenously-prepared customized tissue-engineered mandible. Biomaterials,2006Feb;27:3163-3167.
  3. Warnke PH. In-vivo tissue engineering of biological joint replacements. LANCET. 2010 Aug 7;376(9739):394-6.
  4. Brady MA, Sivananthan S, Mudera V, Liu Q, Wiltfang J, Warnke PH. The primordium of a biological joint replacement: Coupling of two stem cell pathways in biphasic ultrarapid compressed gel niches. J Craniomaxillofac Surg. 2010 Aug 30.
  5. Douglas T, Liu Q, Humpe A, Wiltfang J, Sivananthan S, Warnke PH: Novel ceramic bone replacement material CeraBall(R) seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells. Clin Oral Implants Res. 2010 Mar;21(3):262-7.

Professor Paul Verma

View Professor Paul Verma's Profile

Professor Paul Verma

Principal Research Fellow, Centre for Reproduction & Development, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, Victoria

Ask a Question View Website
  • Principal Scientist - Reproductive Biology - South Australian Research Institute (SAEDI)
  • Principal Research Fellow, Centre for Reproduction & Development, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, Victoria

Research interests

Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can potentially generate specific cell types for regenerative medicine. A major problem limiting the clinical use of ESCs is the potential for tissues derived from these cells to be rejected by receiving patients. The most attractive solution to this problem comprises transplanting tissues derived from ESCs genetically matched to each patient. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), where an adult somatic cell is returned to a embryonic state (a process called reprogramming) following transplantation to an enucleated oocyte, can be used to provide such cells, however, ethical and practical limitations associated with both oocyte donation and human SCNT raise serious concerns about the suitability of this method. An alternative approach to reprogramming cells involves forced expression of a few key stem cell genes in somatic cells, also known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Our key research interests are to investigate efficient reprogramming of somatic cells from a number of mammalian species and generation of functional cells for pre-clinical and clinical applications.

Paul Verma and his team are investigating the potential of embryonic stem cells (ESC) to help understand and treat diseases. ESC also have potential applications in livestock development and species conservation. Recently it has been shown that introduction of a few embryonic genes, can ‘reprogram’ adult cells into embryonic stem cell equivalents, know as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

Our lab was the first to develop iPSCs in Australia from mice, humans and patients with disease. We are also exploring application of this exciting approach to benefit the livestock industry and for species conservation.

Publications

  1. Liu J, Ashton MP, Sumer H, O’Bryan MK, Brodnicki TC, Verma PJ. (2011) Generation of Stable Pluripotent Stem Cells from Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mouse Tail-Tip Fibroblasts. Diabetes; 60(5):1393-8. Epub 2011 Apr 4
  2. Tat PA, Sumer H, Jones K, Upton K. and Verma, PJ. (2010). The efficient generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from adult mouse adipose tissue derived and neural stem cells. Cell Transplantation 19(5):525-36.
  3. Liu J, Sumer H, Leung J, Upton K, Dottori M, Pébay A and Verma PJ. (2010) Late passage human fibroblasts induced to pluripotency are capable of directed neuronal differentiation. Cell Transplantation; 20(2):193-203. Epub 2010 Aug 17.
  4. Liu J*, Verma PJ*, Evans-Galea M, Delatycki M, Michalska A, Leung J, Crombie D, Joe Sarsero J, Williamson R, Dottori M, Pébay A. Generation and Function of Induced-Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Friedreich Ataxia Patients. Stem Cell Reviews and Reports; 7(3):703-13.
  5. Sumer H, Liu J, Malaver-Ortega LF, Lim ML, Khodadi K. and Verma PJ. (2011) Nanog is a key factor for induction of pluripotency in bovine adult fibroblasts. Journal of Animal Science; 89(9):2708-16. Epub 2011 Apr 8.
  6. Liu J, Balehosur D, Murray B, Kelly JM, Sumer H and Verma PJ. (2011) Generation and characterization of reprogrammed sheep induced pluripotent stem cells. Theriogenology (Accepted July 7, 2011)
  7. Verma R, Holland MK, Temple-Smith P, Verma PJ. (2011) Inducing pluripotency in somatic cells from the snow leopard (Panthera uncia), an endangered felid. Theriogenology (Accepted September 22, 2011)

 

Professor Peter Gray

View Professor Peter Gray's Profile

Professor Peter Gray

Director, Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology; Group Leader - Rapid selection of cells producing novel biopharmaceuticals

Ask a Question View Website
  • Director and Group Leader, Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology

Research interests

Professor Gray's research is focused on engineering mammalian cells in order to improve their efficiency and utility in the production of complex proteins, increasingly being used as biopharmaceuticals. Professor Gray’s research is aimed at reducing some of the 'bottlenecks' present when mammalian cells are used to produce biopharmaceuticals, viz:

  1. Developing transient protein expression systems which will allow researchers to rapidly produce larger amounts of protein needed for initial characterisation and testing
  2. Developing high throughput approaches which allow the rapid selection of clones which stably express high levels of the desired biopharmaceutical
  3. Using modern 'omics' approaches to gain better understanding of cellular metabolism which will allow maximal protein expression by mammalian cell cultures.

The research approaches which have been used to gain a greater understanding of mammalian cell processes are now being applied to even more complex cells, viz the development of bioprocesses based on embryonic stem cells. With stem cells the challenge is to accurately define the physical and chemical environment which allows the controlled proliferation and subsequent differentiation of the cells, and then translate these conditions into processes which can be scaled up to produce the number of cells which will be required for clinical testing.

Publications

  1. Prowse AB, Doran MR, Cooper-White JJ, Chong F, Munro TP, Fitzpatrick J, Chung TL, Haylock DN, Gray PP, Wolvetang EJ. (2010). Long term culture of human embryonic stem cells on recombinant vitronectin in ascorbate free media. Biomaterials. Nov;31(32):8281-8.
  2. Doran MR, Frith JE, Prowse AB, Fitzpatrick J, Wolvetang EJ, Munro TP, Gray PP, Cooper-White JJ. (2010). Defined high protein content surfaces for stem cell culture. Biomaterials. 2010 Jul;31(19):5137-42.
  3. Prowse AB, Wilson J, Osborne GW, Gray PP, Wolvetang E. (2009) Multiplexed Staining of Live Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Flow Cytometric Analysis of Pluripotency Markers. Stem Cells Dev. Apr 27.
  4. Prowse AB, McQuade LR, Bryant KJ, Marcal H, Gray PP. (2007) Identification of potential pluripotency determinants for human embryonic stem cells following proteomic analysis of human and mouse fibroblast conditioned media. J Proteome Res. Sep;6(9):3796-807.

Professor Richard Boyd

View Professor Richard Boyd's Profile

Professor Richard Boyd

Director, Monash Immunology and Stem Cell Laboratories, Monash University

Ask a Question View Website
  • Director, Monash Immunology and Stem Cell Laboratories, Monash University

Research interests

Immune Regeneration.

Publications

TBA.

Professor Richard Harvey

View Professor Richard Harvey's Profile

Professor Richard Harvey

Professor Richard Harvey, PhD, FAA, Head, Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Division, Deputy Director, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute; Sir Peter Finley Professor of Cardiac Research, University of New South Wales

Ask a Question View Website
  • Professor Richard Harvey, PhD, FAA
  • Head, Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Division
  • Deputy Director, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute
  • Sir Peter Finley Professor of Cardiac Research, University of New South Wales

Research interests

Professor Richard Harvey received his PhD in 1982 from the University of Adelaide, training in molecular biology. He undertook postdoctoral studies in embryology at Harvard University, then moved to the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne, establishing an independent group. In 1998, he relocated to the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, where he is currently Co-Deputy Director and Head of the Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Division. He holds the endowed Sir Peter Finley Professorship of Heart Research at UNSW and an NHMRC Australia Fellowship, and is a member of EMBO and the Australian Academy of Science. His research has focused on the genetic basis of heart development and congenital heart disease, and more recently on the biology and origin of adult cardiac stem cells, and cardiac regeneration. He is generating IPS cells from human patients with hypoplastic left heart to study the mechanisms of disease.

Recent publications

  1. Review Harvey RP. Links in the left/right axial pathway. Cell 1998; 94:273-76. (IF=31.15; Citations 101)
  2. Lai D, Forrai A, Liu X, Wolstein O, Michalicek J, Ahmed I, Garratt AN, Birchmeier C, Zhou M, Hartley L, Robb L, Feneley MP, Fatkin D, Harvey RP. Neuregulin 1 sustains the gene regulatory network in both trabecular and non-trabecular myocardium. Circulation Research 2010, 107:715-727 [journal cover] (IF=9.98)
  3. Furtado MB, Solloway MJ, Jones V, Costa MW, Biben C, Wolstein O, Preis JI, Sparrow DB, Saga Y, Dunwoodie SL, Robertson EJ, Tam PPL, Harvey RP. BMP/SMAD1 signalling sets a threshold for the left/right pathway in lateral plate mesoderm and limits availability of SMAD4. Genes and Development 2008; 22:3037-3049 (IF=12.07; Citations 1)
  4. Drenckhahn J-D, Schwarz QP, Gray S, Laskowski A, Kiriazis H, Ming Z, Harvey RP, Du X-J, Thorburn DR, Cox TC. Compensatory growth of healthy cardiac cells in the presence of diseased cells restores cardiac tissue homeostasis during heart development. Developmental Cell 2008; 15:521-533 [Journal Cover] (IF=13.36; Citations 1).
  5. Prall OWJ, Menon MK, Solloway MJ, Watanabe Y, Zaffran S, Bajolle F, Biben C, McBride JJ, Robertson BR, Chaulet H, Stennard FA, Wise N, Schaft D, Wolstein O, Furtado MB, Shiratori H, Chien KR, Hamada H, Black BL, Saga Y, Robertson EJ, Buckingham ME, Harvey RP. An Nkx2-5/Bmp2/Smad1 negative feedback loop orchestrates cardiac progenitor cell specification and proliferation in the second heart field. Cell 2007; 128:947-959. (IF=31.15; Citations 47)

Professor Sean Grimmond

View Professor Sean Grimmond's Profile

Professor Sean Grimmond

Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland

Ask a Question View Website
  • Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland

Research interests

The Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics is focused on globally surveying genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic information using next-generation sequencing and array-based approaches, and then integrating this data to define the underlying molecular networks controlling biological processes (such as cell division and differentiation) and pathological states (pancreatic, ovarian and breast cancer). This systems-wide approach will provide the means to identify key genes driving specific phenotypes and also the chance to model the different layers of control guiding biological states.

Publications

  1. G Kolle, J Shepherd, B Gardiner, KS Kassahn, N Cloonan, D Wood, E Nourbakhsh, DF Taylor, S Wani, HS Chy, Q Zhou, K McKernan, S Kuersten, AL Laslett, SM Grimmond. (2011) Deep-transcriptome and ribonome sequencing redefines the molecular networks of pluripotency and the extracellular space in human embryonic stem cells. Genome Research (in press)
  2. G.J. Faulkner, Y. Kimura, C.O. Daub, S. Wani, C. Plessy, K.M. Irvine, K. Schroder, N. Cloonan, A.L. Steptoe, T. Lassmann, K. Waki, N. Hornig, T. Arakawa, H. Takahashi, J. Kawai, A.R.R. Forrest, H. Suzuki, Y. Hayashizaki, D.A. Hume, V. Orlando, S.M. Grimmond, and P. Carninci, The regulated retrotransposon transcriptome of mammalian cells. Nature Genetics 41 (2009) 563-571.
  3. N. Cloonan, A.R.R. Forrest, G. Kolle, B.B.A. Gardiner, G.J. Faulkner, M.K. Brown, D.F. Taylor, A.L. Steptoe, S. Wani, G. Bethel, A.J. Robertson, A.C. Perkins, S.J. Bruce, C.C. Lee, S.S. Ranade, H.E. Peckham, J.M. Manning, K.J. McKernan, and S.M. Grimmond, Stem cell transcriptome profiling via massive-scale mRNA sequencing. Nature Methods 5 (2008) 613-619.
  4. P. Carninci, A. Sandelin, B. Lenhard, S. Katayama, K. Shimokawa, J. Ponjavic, C.A.M. Semple, M.S. Taylor, P.G. Engstrom, M.C. Frith, A.R.R. Forrest, W.B. Alkema, S.L. Tan, C. Plessy, R. Kodzius, T. Ravasi, T. Kasukawa, S. Fukuda, M. Kanamori-Katayama, Y. Kitazume, H. Kawaji, C. Kai, M. Nakamura, H. Konno, K. Nakano, S. Mottagui-Tabar, P. Arner, A. Chesi, S. Gustincich, F. Persichetti, H. Suzuki, S.M. Grimmond, C.A. Wells, V. Orlando, C. Wahlestedt, E.T. Liu, M. Harbers, J. Kawai, V.B. Bajic, D.A. Hume, and Y. Hayashizaki, Genome-wide analysis of mammalian promoter architecture and evolution (vol 38, pg 626, 2006). Nature Genetics 39 (2007) 1174-1174.

Professor Stan Gronthos

View Professor Stan Gronthos's Profile

Professor Stan Gronthos

NHMRC Senior Research Fellow, Head, Mesenchymal Stem Cell Group and Regenerative Medicine Program Department of Haematology, SA Pathology, Frome Road, Adelaide 5000 SA; Co-Director, Centre for Stem Cell Research, Robinson Institute, University of Adelaide, SA

mesenchymal stem cells, bone, dental pulp, periodontal ligament, cementum, gingival fibroblasts
Ask a Question View Website
  • Head, Mesenchymal Stem Cell Group and Regenerative Medicine Program, Department of Haematology, SA Pathology
  • Co-Director, Centre for Stem Cell Research, Robinson Institute, University of Adelaide
  • NHMRC Senior Research Fellow

Research interests

Adult bone marrow contains a non-haematopoietic, stromal stem cell population with the ability to form clonogenic, adherent colonies comprised of fibroblast-like cells (CFU-F: colony forming units-fibroblast). The ex vivo expanded progeny of CFU-F have been shown to develop into different stromal cell lineages (myelosupportive stroma, adipocytes, smooth muscle cells, myoblasts, chondrocytes and osteoblasts) and are thought to arise from a common, self-replicating multi-potential stem cell referred to as mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or bone marrow stromal stem cells. Professor Gronthos' stem cell isolation technology has recently been used to identify MSC-like cells from adipose tissue and dental tissues that exhibit similar growth properties and gene expression profiles to that described for bone marrow derived MSC. This work has resulted in the generation of several patents encompassing the isolation and expansion technologies and use of different MSC preparations for various tissue engineering based applications. These patents have now been licensed to Angioblast Inc. New York, NY. and Mesoblast Ltd., Melbourne Vic.

Research interests are to identify factors and signalling pathways that mediate MSC self-renewal, niche maintenance, proliferation recruitment/migration and multi-differentiation; and to determine the safety and efficacy of MSC-like populations to regenerate functional tissues when implanted into animal models of tissue damage.

Publications

  1. Wada N, Wang B, Lin NH, Laslett AL, Gronthos S, Bartold PM (2011). Induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Journal of Periodontal Research. 46(4):438-47.
  2. Arthur A, Zannettino A, Panagopoulos R, Koblar SA, Sims NA, Stylianou C, Matsuo K, Gronthos S (2011). EphB/ephrin-B interactions mediate human MSC attachment, migration and osteochondral differentiation. Bone. 48(3):533-42.
  3. Menicanin D, Bartold PM, Zannettino AC, Gronthos S (2010). Identification of a Common Gene Expression Signature Associated with Immature Clonal Mesenchymal Cell Populations derived from Bone Marrow and Dental Tissues. Stem Cells and Development. 19(10):1501-10.
  4. Peter J Psaltis, Angelo Carbone, Adam J Nelson, Dennis H Lau, Troy Jantzen, Jim Manavis, Kerry Williams, Silviu Itescu, Prashanthan Sanders, Stan Gronthos, Andrew CW Zannettino, Stephen G Worthley (2010). Reparative Effects of Allogeneic Mesenchymal Precursor Cells Delivered Transendocardially in Experimental Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy. Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions. 3(9): 974-983.
  5. Arthur A, Shi S, Zannettino AC, Fujii N, Gronthos S*, Koblar SA*. (2009). Implanted Adult Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Induce Endogenous Axon Guidance. Stem Cells. 27(9):2229-37. *Co-senior authors.
  6. Isenmann S, Arthur A, Zannettino AC, Turner JL, Shi S, Glackin CA, Gronthos S (2009). TWIST family of basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors Mediate Human Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cell Growth and Commitment. Stem Cells. 27(10):2457-68.

Professor Xin-Fu Zhou

View Professor Xin-Fu Zhou's Profile

Professor Xin-Fu Zhou

Research Chair in Neuroscience, School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia

Ask a Question View Website
  • Research Chair in Neuroscience, School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia

Research interests

Regenerative medicine, iPS, epigenetic reprogramming, neural stem cells.

Publications

  1. Li HY, Say EH, Zhou XF. (2007) Isolation and Characterization of Neural Crest Progenitors from Adult Dorsal Root Ganglia. Stem Cells ;25(8):2053-65.
  2. Lagares A., Li  H-Y , Zhou X-F, Avendaño C. (2007) Primary sensory neuron addition in the adult rat trigeminal ganglion: evidence for neural crest glio-neuronal precursor maturation. Journal of Neuroscience, 27(30):7939-53.
  3. Li HY, Zhou XF. (2008) Potential conversion of adult clavicle-derived chondrocytes into neural lineage cells in vitro. J Cell Physiol. 214(3):630-44.
Go to top